Aquarium - Page 3

Recent Galleries

Hagley Classic Car Show 2011 : Hagley Classic Car Show at the Hagley Museum & Library.  Dennis Gage of "My Classic Car" was filming at this show!
September 18, 2011

Hagley Classic Car Show 2011

KathleenAnnLevine

Hagley Classic Car Show at the Hagley Museum & Library. Dennis Gage o ...

Updated: Sep 18, 2011 3:24pm PST

Shedd Aquarium :

Shedd Aquarium

Gary

Updated: Sep 15, 2011 5:59pm PST

July 2, 2011 : Nostalgia Nights on High Street in Pottstown.
The 4th of July weekend show.
July 2, 2011

July 2, 2011

KathleenAnnLevine

Nostalgia Nights on High Street in Pottstown. The 4th of July weekend ...

Updated: Jul 03, 2011 9:27am PST

New Car! : Our new 2011 Ford Explorer Limited.  Iain is very excited.
June 24, 2011

New Car!

KathleenAnnLevine

Our new 2011 Ford Explorer Limited. Iain is very excited. June 24, 2 ...

Updated: Jun 24, 2011 4:53pm PST

Sea Nettle, Chrysaora Fuscescens : Natural History
Not all jellies sting, but the sea nettle does. It hunts tiny drifting animals by trailing those long tentacles and frilly mouth-arms, all covered with stinging cells. When the tentacles touch prey, the stinging cells paralyze it and stick tight. From there, the prey is moved to the mouth-arms and finally to the mouth, where it's digested. 

Conservation
There is mounting evidence that human influences in coastal habitats may be creating conditions more favorable to jellies, leading to an increased frequency of blooms and reduced populations of larval fishes. They may seem insignificant when washed up on a beach, but gelatinous animals are certainly worthy of our attention and study. The high abundance of sea nettles makes scientists believe they play a significant role in the planktonic food chain. 

Cool Facts
Some jellies commute 3,600 feet (1,097 m) up and down in the water daily—try that without a submarine!

Larval and juvenile cancer crabs may hitch rides on the jelly, dropping off as the jelly comes inshore. These crabs may be feeding on the jelly, as many of the observed jellies with crabs are quite tattered.

Animal Facts
Scientific Name: Chrysaora fuscescens 
Habitat: Open Waters 
Animal Type: Invertebrates 
Diet: young pollock, larval fishes, zooplankton, other jellies 
Size: bell to approximately 17.7 inches (45 cm) in diameter, mouth-arms 12 to 15 feet (3.6 to 4.6 m) long 
Range: coastal waters off Alaska to California, Japan, Kamchatka, the Aleutian Islands and the Bering Sea 
Relatives: purple-striped jelly, other jellies, sea anemones, coral; Family: Pelagiidae

Sea Nettle, Chrysaora Fuscescens

JimG944

Natural History Not all jellies sting, but the sea nettle does. It hu ...

Updated: Feb 26, 2011 10:24pm PST

Penguins : Exhibits at the Monterey Bay AquariumThe stunning one-million-gallon Outer Bay exhibit is home to the largest community of open-ocean animals to be found in any aquarium. Giant bluefin tuna power their way through the water. Hammerhead sharks circle inches away. Sea turtles cruise lazily by.The Outer Bay also features the largest permanent collection of jellyfish species in the United States. Egg-yolk jellies and sea nettles drift gently in ten-foot-long exhibits beautifully lit to accentuate the jellies' delicate beauty. Comb jellies pulse with rainbow bands of light as they swim.In the past, a wonderful exhibit of Jelly Fish and most recently The Secret Life of Seahorses; always something exciting to see at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Penguins

JimG944

Exhibits at the Monterey Bay AquariumThe stunning one-million-gallon O ...

Updated: Feb 26, 2011 8:48pm PST

Moon Jelly, Aurelia Labiata : Natural History
These alien-looking creatures are is named for its their translucent, moonlike circular bells. Instead of long, trailing tentacles, moon jellies have a short, fine fringe (cilia) that sweeps food toward the mucous layer on the edges of the bells. Prey is stored in pouches until the oral arms pick it up and begin to digest it. 

The coloration of a moon jelly often changes depending on its diet. If the jelly feeds extensively on crustaceans, it turns pink or lavender. An orange tint hints that a jelly’s been feeding on brine shrimp. 

Scientists have studied the life cycle of this jelly extensively. They know the adult male moon jelly releases strands of sperm, which are ingested by female moon jellies. After fertilization, larvae settle on or near the seafloor and grow into polyps. Polyps alternate between feeding and reproductive stages for up to 25 years. In the reproductive phase, polyps launch buds of cloned juveniles, known as ephyrae, which grow into adult medusae. 

Found worldwide in temperate and tropical waters, moon jellies feed in quiet bays and harbors. Although moon jellies have a sting, they pose little threat to humans. 

Conservation
Moon jellies are very plentiful. However, plastic bags that end up in the ocean often look like jellies to animals that depend on these drifting creatures for food. Thousands of turtles and birds die each year after swallowing indigestible wads of plastic mistaken for jellies. You can help by picking up plastic on the beach and near storm drains. 

Like other jelly populations, overabundant moon jellies indicate an unbalanced ecosystem. Scientists have discovered that jellies reproduce best when the water has too many nutrients—usually the result of run-off from land—and too little oxygen. 

Cool Facts
Although they didn’t get to the moon, nearly 2,500 moon jelly polyps and ephyrae—two early stages in the jelly life cycle—went into orbit aboard the space shuttle Columbia in May 1991. They were part of a study on the effects of weightlessness on development of internal organs in juvenile jellies.

Animal Facts
Scientific Name:Aurelia labiata 
Habitat: Open Waters 
Animal Type: Invertebrates 
Diet: small plankton, like molluscs, crustaceans, fish eggs and other small jellies 
Size: to 15 inches (38 cm) in diameter 
Range: common in Monterey Bay and along the California coast, and in the waters off the East Coast, Europe, Japan and the Gulf of Mexico 
Relatives: Portuguese man-of-war, hydromedusae, other siphonophores, sea anemones, coral; Family: Ulmaridae

Moon Jelly, Aurelia Labiata

JimG944

Natural History These alien-looking creatures are is named for its th ...

Updated: Feb 25, 2011 8:55pm PST

Leafy Sea Dragon, Phycodurus Eques : Exhibits at the Monterey Bay AquariumThe stunning one-million-gallon Outer Bay exhibit is home to the largest community of open-ocean animals to be found in any aquarium. Giant bluefin tuna power their way through the water. Hammerhead sharks circle inches away. Sea turtles cruise lazily by.The Outer Bay also features the largest permanent collection of jellyfish species in the United States. Egg-yolk jellies and sea nettles drift gently in ten-foot-long exhibits beautifully lit to accentuate the jellies' delicate beauty. Comb jellies pulse with rainbow bands of light as they swim.In the past, a wonderful exhibit of Jelly Fish and most recently The Secret Life of Seahorses; always something exciting to see at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Leafy Sea Dragon, Phycodurus Eques

JimG944

Exhibits at the Monterey Bay AquariumThe stunning one-million-gallon O ...

Updated: Feb 24, 2011 9:34pm PST

Egg-Yolk Jelly, Phacellophora Camtschatica : Exhibits at the Monterey Bay Aquarium

The stunning one-million-gallon Outer Bay exhibit is home to the largest community of open-ocean animals to be found in any aquarium. Giant bluefin tuna power their way through the water. Hammerhead sharks circle inches away. Sea turtles cruise lazily by.

The Outer Bay also features the largest permanent collection of jellyfish species in the United States. Egg-yolk jellies and sea nettles drift gently in ten-foot-long exhibits beautifully lit to accentuate the jellies' delicate beauty. Comb jellies pulse with rainbow bands of light as they swim.

In the past, a wonderful exhibit of Jelly Fish and most recently The Secret Life of Seahorses; always something exciting to see at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Egg-Yolk Jelly, Phacellophora Camtsch...

JimG944

Exhibits at the Monterey Bay Aquarium The stunning one-million-gall ...

Updated: Feb 09, 2011 8:25pm PST

Black Sea Nettle, Chrysaora Achlyos : Natural History
The black sea nettle is considered a giant jelly; its distinctive purplish bell can reach over three feet (91 cm) in diameter; its lacy, pinkish oral-arms  can reach nearly 20 feet (6 m) in length and its stinging tentacles 25 feet (7.6 m) or more. It probably lives in deeper, calmer waters but has appeared in large blooms  in California coastal waters, most recently in 2010. 

Conservation
Giant black sea nettles appeared in droves along the San Diego shoreline in the summer of 1989. Then they mysteriously disappeared. The giant drifters reappeared again ten years later, in the summer of 1999. Increased numbers of sea nettles may be an indication that human activities have changed the condition of the ocean. Increased organic material means more nutrients. More nutrients, plus fertilizers from farms, enrich the plankton,  providing more food for jellies and allowing them to increase in number.It is likely that the appearance of black sea nettles in coastal California waters is also related to El Nino/La Nina events. 

Cool Facts
The black sea nettle provides the Pacific butterfish with food and protection. The silvery butterfish feeds on the plankton gathered by the jelly, and when danger approaches, the butterfish actually hides inside the jelly’s bell. The black sea nettle is a mysterious creature; during most years its whereabouts are unknown. Scientists just recently named this jelly in 1997, although pictures of the species were taken as early as 1926. Much about its behavior, distribution and life cycle remain a puzzle.

Animal Facts
Scientific Name: Chrysaora achlyos 
Habitat: Open Waters 
Animal Type: Invertebrates 
Diet: plankton including other jellies 
Size: to 3 feet (1 m) and oral arms extending to 20 feet (6 m) 
Range: Mexico, southern Baja California, Monterey Bay(rare) 
Relatives: Portuguese man-of-war, other jellies, sea anemones, coral; Family: Pelagiidae

Black Sea Nettle, Chrysaora Achlyos

JimG944

Natural History The black sea nettle is considered a giant jelly; its ...

Updated: Feb 09, 2011 7:26pm PST