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Hazen Brigade Monument -  Surrounding the monument are the graves of 45 of the 409 men in Hazen's Brigade who fell defending Round Forest.  In the words of 1st Lt. Edward Crebbin of the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry who erected the monument...    "...around the spot where the monument was erected...to the best recollection 113 of our regiment were killed and wounded...it is hoped that the monument will remain standing as a memorial to the gallant and patriotic men of General Hazen's brigade who fell...in defense of Union and Liberty."
Hazen Brigade Monument -  Standing atop the hill at Round Forest is a walled monument and graveyard unique among Civil War Battlefield Monuments.  As opposed to most, which were erected long after the war, this one was erected in the summer of 1863 barely six months after the battle.  Later in 1863, 45 of the fallen of Hazen's Brigade were buried here and in 1864 the monument was inscribed.  It is the oldest existing Civil War monument in the nation...
First Day - Dec. 31, 1862 - Mid-Afternoon - Round Forest -  Granted a lull in the early afternoon to strengthen his position, Colonel Hazen and his defiant brigade stood ready when the Confederates resumed their piecemeal attacks against Round Forest in mid-afternoon.  For four hours, wave after wave of Rebel assaults were flung against the forest.  Each time these assaults were swept away by the intensity of the Union fire rained down upon them.  The last assaults were carried out as dusk descended and were repulsed so easily that Union defenders wondered if they actually represented a serious effort on the Confederates part.  As the first day of battle drew to a close, Hazen's Brigade hadn't moved one inch and spread out before and around it was a bloody tapestry of death and destruction.  "Hell's Half-acre' as it would soon be known, marked the turning point in the battle.  The Union line had held firm.  Though both armies had suffered massively this day, the advantage had now shifted to the men in blue...
First Day - Dec. 31, 1862 - Afternoon - Pioneer Brigade - By early afternoon the Union position along the Nashville Pike was solid but by no means unbreakable.  The enormous loss of men suffered during the morning hours meant that Rosecrans had to continually pull up reserve troops to fill his thinning ranks.  Such was his desperation that he even called on units not accustomed to front line duty.  The so-called 'Pioneer Brigade" was one such unit.  Made up primarily of Mid-westerners, these men were normally called upon for important engineering projects such as bridge building and road improvements.  Virtually untested in battle, Rosecrans was taking a gamble on these men being able to stand up to the Confederate onslaught.  But stand up they did.  When other veteran units were falling back, the Pioneer Brigade held firm.  In all, the regimental history records that they withstood five Confederate assaults.  Despite taking heavy casualties, the Brigade was instrumental in holding the line and denying a Confederate victory at Stones River...
First Day - Dec. 31, 1862 - 7:00am - Sheridan Makes a Stand - Of all the divisional commanders on the field that morning, Brigadier General Philip Sheridan had had the foresight to prepare his men for an imminent attack.  This meant that, though the right flank of the Union line quickly broke Sheridan's brigades held firm.  Sheridan's foresight and determination likely saved the battle for the Union.  Wave after wave of rebel attacks struck Sheridan's lines but they held firm.  For two precious hours these brigades blunted the Confederate advance allowing General Rosecrans to form a more solid defensive line along the Nashville Pike...
First Day - Dec. 31, 1862 - 8:30am - The Slaughter Pen - To General Sheridan's left was the division led by Major General James S. Negley who had taken up positions in a strange cedar forest with a broken, rugged limestone floor.  For hour after bloody hour the Confederate's hit these woods with uncoordinated, piecemeal attacks.  The carnage was unthinkable.  By noon, the defenders of these woods found themselves running out of ammunition and flanked on both sides and they finally retreated.  The cost had been enormous.      As one Confederate recalled upon reaching the Union lines:  "I cannot remember now of ever seeing more dead men and horses and captured cannon all jumbled together, than that scene of blood and carnage … on the (Wilkinson) … Turnpike; the ground was literally covered with blue coats dead.”  Union soldiers thought the scene reminiscent of the slaughter pens of the Chicago stockyards...the name stuck...
McFadden's Lane - This now bucolic lane was at the start of the battle the center of the Union line.  Though the battle started far to the right of the troops here, the quick collapse of those divisions brought the battle here in a hurry...
First Day - Dec. 31, 1862 - 12:00pm - Parsons' Batteries -  To the left of the carnage at the Slaughter Pen, a pair of Union Batteries under Captain Charles C. Parsons was also doing more than its part to hold back the Confederate tide.  With four 3-inch ordinance rifles and four 12-pounder howitzers, Parsons men dealt out death and destruction at an incredible rate over the course of four hours that morning.  In all, his eight guns fired 2,199 rounds at the enemy and, despite being critically low on ammunition, refused to abandon his position until orders came to fall back to the now stout Union line along the Nashville Pike...
Headquarters, Army of the Tennessee - Brigadier General Braxton Bragg - Stones River itself as it  flows but a few dozen yards behind Bragg's Headquarters...
Fortress Rosecrans (ca. 1863-1866) - Sortie Passage -  "The sortie passages ... are designed to admit, or give exit to, large masses of our own troops, in the case of a general engagement taking place..." --General Morton, USA    'To find such a wide break in a fort's wall seems strange to a person today. Yet the gap you see here - then called a sortie passage - is a carefully calculated part of the defenses of Fortress Rosecrans.  The area close to the walls was covered by cannon fire from many nearby angles. Enemy troops could not reach this point without suffering massive losses. With all the nearby trees and brush cleared away, Fortress Rosecrans had no blind spots. No enemy came close.'  --text from NPS informational sign
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Winslow's Battery, at Fort Shenandoah.  Fall Nationals 2008. Photo by Rachel Mackintosh.
Entrance to the National Cemetery. Photo by Allissa Weber.
Hazen Brigade Monument - Surrounding the monument are the graves of 45 of the 409 men in Hazen's Brigade who fell defending Round Forest. In the words of 1st Lt. Edward Crebbin of the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry who erected the monument...

"...around the spot where the monument was erected...to the best recollection 113 of our regiment were killed and wounded...it is hoped that the monument will remain standing as a memorial to the gallant and patriotic men of General Hazen's brigade who fell...in defense of Union and Liberty."

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Hazen Brigade Monument -  Surrounding the monument are the graves of 45 of the 409 men in Hazen's Brigade who fell defending Round Forest.  In the words of 1st Lt. Edward Crebbin of the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry who erected the monument...    "...around the spot where the monument was erected...to the best recollection 113 of our regiment were killed and wounded...it is hoped that the monument will remain standing as a memorial to the gallant and patriotic men of General Hazen's brigade who fell...in defense of Union and Liberty."
Hazen Brigade Monument - Surrounding the monument are the graves of 45 of the 409 men in Hazen's Brigade who fell defending Round Forest. In the words of 1st Lt. Edward Crebbin of the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry who erected the monument...

"...around the spot where the monument was erected...to the best recollection 113 of our regiment were killed and wounded...it is hoped that the monument will remain standing as a memorial to the gallant and patriotic men of General Hazen's brigade who fell...in defense of Union and Liberty."

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Photo by: Dan Weemhoff (dwhike) · See photo in original gallery.

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