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Confederate Memorial - This monument was erected in 1917 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of all the southern soldiers who fought at Shiloh.  Each branch of the military is represented by the statues as well as the carved bust of General Johnson who fell during the battle.  Two plaques on the back of the monument read as follows...    "Let us covenant each with the other and each with those whose sacrifices hallow this field to stand for patriotism, principle, and conviction as did they even unto death."    "The States of the South sent to the Battle of Shiloh seventy-nine organizations of infantry, ten organizations of cavalry, and twenty-three batteries of artillery.  How bravely and how well they fought let the tablets of history on this field tell.  As a greeting to the living remnant of that host of gray and in honor of its dead whether sleeping in distant places or graveless here in traceless dust, this monument has been lifted up by the hands of a loving and grateful people."
Iowa Memorial - This 75' tall monument was erected in 1906.  According to the inscription it was erected by the State of Iowa in commemoration of the loyalty, patriotism, and bravery of her sons who, on this battlefield of Shiloh on the 6th and 7th days of April, A.D., 1862, fought to perpetuate the sacred union of the States."    Of the 6,664 men from Iowa who were engaged in battle at Shiloh, 2,409 (36%) were casualties...by far the highest price paid at any battle of the war by Iowans.
Illinois State Memorial - One of 40 monuments Illinois erected at Shiloh, this is the largest.  Dedicated in 1904 the inscription reads, "Illinois erects this monument to commemorate her sons who here gave their services to perpetuate the honor and glory of the United States."
Michigan Memorial - Erected in 1918 in honor of her three regiments of infantry and one battery of artillery which fought in the battle.  The lengthy inscription reads...    "THIS MONUMENT  is erected and dedicated by  THE PEOPLE OF MICHIGAN to the memory of HER SOLDIERS  who fought and fell in THE BATTLE OF SHILOH. The 12th MICHIGAN INFANTRY met the first Confederate line in the early morning of April 6, 1862, and helped to resist its sudden advance. 27 killed, 54 wounded, 109 missing - total, 190 men. The 15th MICHIGAN INFANTRY, unassigned, although not supplied with ammunition, moved to the front as the battle opened, endeavoring to meet the Confederates with bayonets, but was forced to return to the Landing for ammunition, after which it "fought with conspicuous gallantry" until the close of the battle. Losing 23 killed, 74 wounded, 5 missing - total, 102 men. ROSS' BATTERY B, MICHIGAN LIGHT ARTILLERY was conspicuous in the desperate struggles of the first day in the "Peach Orchard" and near the "Bloody Pond", fighting until ordered to retire. While preparing to execute this order, it was changed and captured by Confederate cavalry within a few feet of this monument, losing four of its six guns. Losses: 5 wounded, 56 missing - total, 102 men. More enduring than this granite will be the gratitude of Michigan to her soldiers of Shiloh."
Missouri Memorial - In 1975 a group of Boy Scouts from Missouri were touring the battlefield and noticed to their surprise that, despite having soldiers who fought for both the Union and Confederacy at Shiloh, their home state was not represented by a monument.  After a number of years of fundraising, in 1982, this memorial was erected.  The inscription reads, "In memory of her sons who fought and died to preserve those freedoms in which they believed: Battle of Shiloh April 6th and 7th, 1862."
Pennsylvania Memorial - Erected in 1902 in honor of the 77th Pennsylvania Regiment, the only Pennsylvania Regiment to fight at Shiloh.
Minnesota Memorial - Erected in 1921, the Minnesota Monument stands in what was the heart of the Hornet's Nest in honor of the 1st Minnesota Independent Battery.  The inscription gives an account of the unit's actions at Shiloh:      "Engaged from early in the morning, when Capt. Munch waswounded and disabled, in the first day's battle of Shiloh,April 6, 1862. The right and left sections under command of 1st Lieut. William Pfaender participated in the struggle of the "Hornets' Nest" where this monument stands. The two guns of the center section were disabled early in the day, but one of them took part in the evening in repelling the last charge of the Confederates. Capt. E. Munch and 1st Lieut. F. E. Peebles wounded; three men killed and six men wounded."
John D. Putnam Stump - Private John D. Putnam of Company F of the 14th Wisconsin Infantry was part of the counterattack on the second day of battle at Shiloh.  While charging a Confederate battery, Private Putnam was killed and his comrades buried him beneath a nearby oak tree and inscribed his name upon it.  Upon completion of the National Cemetery, Putnam's body was re-interred but the stump of the tree with his name upon it was moved to the State Capitol Building in Madison, Wisconsin.  The capitol unfortunately burned down years later but photos of the stump allowed Wisconsin to recreate it in granite and return it to the site where Putnam fell all those years before...
Tennessee Memorial -  This monument, dedicated in 2005, is titled 'Passing of Honor' and is dedicated to the Tennesseans who fought at Shiloh.  The importance of the fight to these men is summed up in the following words, inscribed of the monument..."The Tennesseans had more to fight for.  The fight was for their homes and firesides."  -Brigadier General Patrick R. Cleburne
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "...Nor shall your glory be forgot while Fame her record keeps..."
Moments of silence...
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "...On fame's eternal camping-ground their silent tents are spread..."
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "...Nor war's wild note, nor glory's peal  Shall thrill with fierce delight..."
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "...The charge, the dreadful cannonade, the din and shout, are past..."
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "...And Glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead."
Confederate Memorial - This monument was erected in 1917 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of all the southern soldiers who fought at Shiloh. Each branch of the military is represented by the statues as well as the carved bust of General Johnson who fell during the battle. Two plaques on the back of the monument read as follows...

"Let us covenant each with the other and each with those whose sacrifices hallow this field to stand for patriotism, principle, and conviction as did they even unto death."

"The States of the South sent to the Battle of Shiloh seventy-nine organizations of infantry, ten organizations of cavalry, and twenty-three batteries of artillery. How bravely and how well they fought let the tablets of history on this field tell. As a greeting to the living remnant of that host of gray and in honor of its dead whether sleeping in distant places or graveless here in traceless dust, this monument has been lifted up by the hands of a loving and grateful people."

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Confederate Memorial - This monument was erected in 1917 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of all the southern soldiers who fought at Shiloh.  Each branch of the military is represented by the statues as well as the carved bust of General Johnson who fell during the battle.  Two plaques on the back of the monument read as follows...    "Let us covenant each with the other and each with those whose sacrifices hallow this field to stand for patriotism, principle, and conviction as did they even unto death."    "The States of the South sent to the Battle of Shiloh seventy-nine organizations of infantry, ten organizations of cavalry, and twenty-three batteries of artillery.  How bravely and how well they fought let the tablets of history on this field tell.  As a greeting to the living remnant of that host of gray and in honor of its dead whether sleeping in distant places or graveless here in traceless dust, this monument has been lifted up by the hands of a loving and grateful people."
Confederate Memorial - This monument was erected in 1917 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in honor of all the southern soldiers who fought at Shiloh. Each branch of the military is represented by the statues as well as the carved bust of General Johnson who fell during the battle. Two plaques on the back of the monument read as follows...

"Let us covenant each with the other and each with those whose sacrifices hallow this field to stand for patriotism, principle, and conviction as did they even unto death."

"The States of the South sent to the Battle of Shiloh seventy-nine organizations of infantry, ten organizations of cavalry, and twenty-three batteries of artillery. How bravely and how well they fought let the tablets of history on this field tell. As a greeting to the living remnant of that host of gray and in honor of its dead whether sleeping in distant places or graveless here in traceless dust, this monument has been lifted up by the hands of a loving and grateful people."

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Photo by: Dan Weemhoff (dwhike) · See photo in original gallery.

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