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Second Day - April 7, 1862 - 1:30pm - Water Oaks Pond -  The Confederate's last desperate attempt to wrest victory from the jaws of defeat took place here, at Water Oaks Pond, along their left flank.  Personally encouraging the troops by his presence at the front, Beauregard organized a last desperate assault across this marshy ground towards McClernand's First Division...
Second Day - April 7, 1862 - 2:00pm- Water Oaks Pond -  Charging across the shallow waters of Water Oaks Pond, the Confederates slammed head-long into the Union troops under Brigadier General Alexander McCook, temporarily driving them back.  After overcoming their initial panic, McCook's men reformed and gained reinforcements on their flanks.  The Confederates were now charging into a cauldron of fire erupting on them from all sides.  Observing the futility of continued carnage, around 2:30pm a staff officer asked Beauregard, "General, do you not think our troops as very much in the condition of a lump of sugar thoroughly soaked in water, but yet preserving its original shape, though ready to dissolve?  Would it not be judicious to get away with what we have?"  Not long later General Beauregard gave the order to retreat back towards Corinth...    The Battle of Shiloh was over...
Second Day - April 7, 1862 - Field Hospital -  The carnage wrought by the Battle of Shiloh was unlike anything witnessed up to this point in the war.  After the guns fell silent there were some 16,400 wounded men to care for strewn across the bloody fields.  Numerous impromptu field hospitals were erected nearby to deal with the enormous task.  One was situated here, near a farm owned by Noah Cantrell, which treated around 2,500 men...
Second Day - April 7, 1862 - Field Hospital -  The carnage wrought by the Battle of Shiloh was unlike anything witnessed up to this point in the war.  After the guns fell silent there were some 16,400 wounded men to care for strewn across the bloody fields.  Numerous impromptu field hospitals were erected nearby to deal with the enormous task.  One was situated here, near a farm owned by Noah Cantrell, which treated around 2,500 men...
Confederate Burial Trench #1 -  Though the Union dead from the battle were interred in the nearby National Cemetery, the Confederate dead were buried on the field of battle where they fell in burial trenches such as these.  Records indicate that 11 or 12 mass graves like this were created to inter the 1,728 Confederate dead but only 5 have been located within the current park...
Confederate Burial Trench #5 -  Though the Union dead from the battle were interred in the nearby National Cemetery, the Confederate dead were buried on the field of battle where they fell in burial trenches such as these.  Records indicate that 11 or 12 mass graves like this were created to inter the 1,728 Confederate dead but only 5 have been located within the current park...
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866) -  After the battle, soldiers of both sides were quickly buried generally where they fell.  It was soon decided though that a more appropriate resting place should be established in their honor nearby.  Thus, in 1866, Shiloh National Cemetery was established and fallen Union soldiers were recovered from the battlefield and re-interred there often in regimental groupings...
Confederate Burial Trench #3 -  Though the Union dead from the battle were interred in the nearby National Cemetery, the Confederate dead were buried on the field of battle where they fell in burial trenches such as these.  Records indicate that 11 or 12 mass graves like this were created to inter the 1,728 Confederate dead but only 5 have been located within the current park.    Of the five known burial trenches this one, located near Water Oaks Pond, is the largest and is thought to contain as many as 721 remains...
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866) -  The cemetery as viewed from the main entrance.  The monument containing the vertical cannon tube marks the location of General Ulysses S. Grant's Headquarters at the time of the battle...
Shiloh National Cemetery (ca. 1866)    "The muffled drum's sad roll has beat the soldiers last tattoo..."
First Day - April 6, 1862 - Evening to Overnight- Gunboat Artillery -  In addition to his land forces, General Grant had enlisted in the defense of his last line two wooden gunboats, the Lexington and Tyler.  The big guns on these boats would be a fearful threat to the Confederate troops advancing to attack Grants left at Dill Branch.  Though the steepness of the terrain along the river meant most of the gunboats shells passed harmlessly overhead, their continual fiery threat made for a very nerve-racking evening and overnight for the Rebels.    This cannon, positioned on land and pointing towards Dill Branch, represents the type of guns which were utilized by the gunboats to harass the Confederates advancing across the ravine beyond...
April 6-7, 1862 - Overnight - Pittsburg Landing - Darkness did nothing to serve the nerves of the men still manning the lines across the battlefield.  The two Union gunboats continued to toss shells into Confederates lines at half hour intervals and a late night thunderstorm added its own discomfort.  Both commanding generals had intentions of renewing the battle the next day but with widely differing views on the others situation.  Confederate General Beauregard claimed he had just won a 'complete victory' and had Grant 'just where he wanted him'.  In Beauregard's mind a single vigorous attack would complete the victory which he had 'won'...
First Day - April 6, 1862 - 9:00am to 4:00pm - The Sunken Road - Some 5,700 U.S. troops under the command of Wallace, Prentiss, and Hurlbut were deployed along the edge of the woods on the north side of Duncan Field along an old wagon trail worn deep into the soil.  This 'sunken road' gave natural cover for the Union troops defending it.  Coming against them would be over 4,000 Rebels under the command of Generals Cleburne, Stewart, and Hindman...
First Day - April 6, 1862 - 9:00am to 4:00pm - The Hornets Nest -  By early afternoon coordinated Confederate assaults had degenerated into piecemeal attacks against the Union line.  Federal cannon and musket fire had taken a terrible tool on the attackers, sometimes waiting until the Confederates were within 20 yards before opening fire for maximum damage...
First Day - April 6, 1862 - 9:00am to 4:00pm - The Hornets Nest -  The tenacity of the Union line cannot be overstated.  By the time the Hornets nest and Sunken Road lines began to falter after 7 hours of fighting.  By the end of the battle here the Confederates were so desperate to break the stalemate that they positioned over 60-cannon to pummel the stubborn blue line.  Nevertheless, the Union line held until around 4 when, with its flanks in danger, it began to collapse...
Second Day - April 7, 1862 - 1:30pm - Water Oaks Pond - The Confederate's last desperate attempt to wrest victory from the jaws of defeat took place here, at Water Oaks Pond, along their left flank. Personally encouraging the troops by his presence at the front, Beauregard organized a last desperate assault across this marshy ground towards McClernand's First Division...

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Second Day - April 7, 1862 - 1:30pm - Water Oaks Pond -  The Confederate's last desperate attempt to wrest victory from the jaws of defeat took place here, at Water Oaks Pond, along their left flank.  Personally encouraging the troops by his presence at the front, Beauregard organized a last desperate assault across this marshy ground towards McClernand's First Division...
Second Day - April 7, 1862 - 1:30pm - Water Oaks Pond - The Confederate's last desperate attempt to wrest victory from the jaws of defeat took place here, at Water Oaks Pond, along their left flank. Personally encouraging the troops by his presence at the front, Beauregard organized a last desperate assault across this marshy ground towards McClernand's First Division...

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Photo by: Dan Weemhoff (dwhike) · See photo in original gallery.

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