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Mill Creek - Though it doesn't look like much in these shots, during the battle the creek was at flood stage which prevented Confederate cavalry from conducting a raid on General Sherman's rear.  The bridge crossing the stream (which no longer exists) was important, strategically, as it was the only avenue of retreat for the Confederate Army...
Lincoln Home (ca. 1844-1846) - This is how the Lincoln home looked when he purchased it in 1844...he didn't waste any time starting the remodeling...
Lincoln's home has been restored to its appearance when he left for Washington DC in 1861.  Lincoln lived here for 17 years and made a number of changes to the looks of the home over the years as you can see in the following pics...
Henry Onstot Cooper Shop:  A cooper shop is the place where town residents could purchase buckets, tubs, and barrels.  Henry Onstot operated this shop from 1835 to 1840 when he moved to Petersburg.  This is the only original structure at the New Salem site.
Trent Brothers Residence:  Alexander Trent, his brother, and their families lived in this small cabin.  Alexander was briefly both a tavern owner and ferry operator in the early 1830's.
Martin Waddell:  Waddell and his family lived in New Salem from 1832 to 1838.  Waddell made a living as a hatter, or maker of hats.  With quite a large family, this must have been a very busy location 170 years ago!
Isaac Burner Residence:  Upon arrival in New Salem Isaac Burner purchased the twin lot this house sits on for a reasonable price of $10.  Burner and his family lived here only until 1835 when he moved to Knoxville, IL.
Carding Mill & Wool House: Samuel Hill opened his carding mill in May of 1835.  A carding mill is a place where patrons could bring their wool to be made into yarn for various uses.  The mill was a bustling center of activity during Lincoln's time at New Salem.
Confederate Attacks - Day 1 - On the first day of battle the confederates made five attacks across these fields without success...
Confederate Attacks - Day 1 - On the first day of battle the confederates made five attacks across these fields without success...
Fighting Below the Road - Day 1 - It was here, in some of the bloodiest fighting of the battle, that a Union Division under General J.D. Morgan halted the brief Confederate breakthrough...
Confederate Works - Although the sign says they still exist, I couldn't find them...regardless, the earthworks were built here to protect the nearby Mill Creek Bridge...
Overlay of the previous image from 1880 onto my image from October 25, 2009.   Today's lane is a little wider.   The fence on each side has been moved further out.  A split rail fence rather than vertical fence with horizontal rails was added on the right (monument was added too) but the most important change is that there was a building located on the north side of the curve where the Lane inclines on the west end.  This structure is known as the Ward House. It was purchased and removed by the National Park Service many years ago.   Going back to the previous image for better detail...... notice that this building looks like it was a two story structure that had to have a foundation.  In other words, when it was built and then removed  there had to be some significant ground landscaping movement of earth.
Mill Creek - Though it doesn't look like much in these shots, during the battle the creek was at flood stage which prevented Confederate cavalry from conducting a raid on General Sherman's rear. The bridge crossing the stream (which no longer exists) was important, strategically, as it was the only avenue of retreat for the Confederate Army...

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Mill Creek - Though it doesn't look like much in these shots, during the battle the creek was at flood stage which prevented Confederate cavalry from conducting a raid on General Sherman's rear.  The bridge crossing the stream (which no longer exists) was important, strategically, as it was the only avenue of retreat for the Confederate Army...
Mill Creek - Though it doesn't look like much in these shots, during the battle the creek was at flood stage which prevented Confederate cavalry from conducting a raid on General Sherman's rear. The bridge crossing the stream (which no longer exists) was important, strategically, as it was the only avenue of retreat for the Confederate Army...

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Photo by: Dan Weemhoff (dwhike) · See photo in original gallery.

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