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05-23-2015 - The pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana) is a species of artiodactyl mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America. Though not an antelope, it is often known colloquially in North America as the prong buck, pronghorn antelope,cabri (native American), or simply antelope because it closely resembles the true antelopes of the Old World and fills a similar ecological niche due to convergent evolution. [Wiki]  Shot near Lucerne Valley, UT       Link to Photo  Without Frame   
Cooling off  Capybara pair cooling off in the Rio Cuiaba, Pantanal, Brazil.  I've always found there to be something quite appealing about capybaras, the world's largest rodents, and liked this male (on left) and female pair sitting placidly in the water by the edge of the river.  Other photos of Pantanal wildlife can be seen here: http://goo.gl/JcZRBH  22/05/15 www.allenfotowild.com
The variegation in light on these hydrangea blossoms caught my eye, more so probably than would full sunlight or uniform shade have done.  DP143-2015  Posted Saturday, May 23  Taken May 20, 2015 Matthaei Botanical Gardens, Ann Arbor  Title:  Hydrangea in dappled sunlight
May 23, 2015  I'm renting a few long lenses to see if I like them.  If I do find one I like, then I may buy one, or rent the favorite to take on our Alaska cruise this summer.  The first one that I'm trying out is a Tamron 150-600.  I was out in our backyard checking it out last Sunday, and as luck would have it, a pair of Roadrunners came out of their forested hiding places.  The female in the foreground was in our backyard, and the male was on the other side of the fence on our neighbor's driveway.  It's not the greatest photo, but I was just so thrilled to get them both in the same shot, that I decided to share.  I'm shooting at them from probably about 300 feet away.  I have cropped the shot just a bit.  "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly."  ~ Langston Hughes  Have a wonderful and fine day today my friends!  Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com
Papaver Fire Take a shot of a poppy flower petal from a couple days ago, a rainy afternoon, and a bit of computer time ...  Many thanks for ranking my 'folly' shot under the top ten yesterday.  Much appreciated.
Sunset Silhouette of a Pigeon Guillemot. Taken near Olympia, Wa.  I really appreciate the comments and the interest in my "Troubadour" Savannah Sparrow shot! Thank you
May 23. Sailing Swan. Headed to Ft.Lauderdale to enjoy a long Memorial Day weekend so will have llimited access to comment.
Sunset behind the dunes. Notice the deer on the left/middle
KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA
Green is the color of hope.  These sea grasses I found in a pond last summer. They have arranged themselves so neatly that I had to take a picture of them.
May 8, 2015  Thank you all for your comments on my published dragonfly photo and the PP done by the University. Many of you asked what the other photos were that were selected  and I will post them soon. But to answer those questions: besides the dragonfly, they selected a honey bee and a Queen butterfly. Thank you, I  am humbly grateful for your comments.  .  This is a plaster mold of a crocodile's (it could be an alligator - I forgot) skull that is covered with beads and faux stones.  I was told that the teeth were real, but the skull was not.  This was on display at the Safari Club International show in Las Vegas.  Thank you for your comments and critiques.  Have a "bejeweled" day today my friends.  And..........TGIF!  Linda http://www.lgood.smugmug.com
Pistils So many beautiful flowers at the Los Angeles County Arboretum.... So little time!
In my photography of flowers and flowering trees this spring, I am trying to make a more conscious effort to include photographs of the blooms in context, as part of the landscape they are meant to enhance.  This is a scene on the central campus of the U. of Michigan, with Burton Tower (left) and a corner of the Alumni Center in the background.  This was taken on the Saturday when most colleges within the university held their commencements, and the white area screened by trees was part of a large canopy, under which were laid out tables and chairs, for some kind of post-commencement celebration.  DP132-2015  Posted Tuesday, May 12;  Taken May 3, and processed May 12. For a closer view of the tulips, and a wider angle view of the scene, start here:  http://smu.gs/1zW0Zq8  Title:  Greeting Visitors to the Campus - Tulips along Fletcher Street
May 21, 2015 Not too long ago I was taking photos in Bill's workshop under florescent lights.  Then I decided to go outside and walk around the house to take some other photos of whatever caught my eye.  The little Redbud tree in the backyard caught my eye because the buds were quickly fading, and the green leaves were starting to pop out.  As soon as I took the first photo, I checked the LCD screen, and realized that I had not reset the White Balance.  So I changed it and went on shooting.  When I downloaded the photos, I sort of liked the "off kilter" color in the blooms here, so I decided to keep and post it just for fun.  "Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer's day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time." ~ John Lubbock  Thank you for your comments and critiques.  Have a great and colorful day today my friends.  Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com
05-23-2015 - The pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana) is a species of artiodactyl mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America. Though not an antelope, it is often known colloquially in North America as the prong buck, pronghorn antelope,cabri (native American), or simply antelope because it closely resembles the true antelopes of the Old World and fills a similar ecological niche due to convergent evolution. [Wiki]

Shot near Lucerne Valley, UT     

Link to Photo Without Frame   

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05-23-2015 - The pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana) is a species of artiodactyl mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America. Though not an antelope, it is often known colloquially in North America as the prong buck, pronghorn antelope,cabri (native American), or simply antelope because it closely resembles the true antelopes of the Old World and fills a similar ecological niche due to convergent evolution. [Wiki]  Shot near Lucerne Valley, UT       Link to Photo  Without Frame   
05-23-2015 - The pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana) is a species of artiodactyl mammal indigenous to interior western and central North America. Though not an antelope, it is often known colloquially in North America as the prong buck, pronghorn antelope,cabri (native American), or simply antelope because it closely resembles the true antelopes of the Old World and fills a similar ecological niche due to convergent evolution. [Wiki]

Shot near Lucerne Valley, UT     

Link to Photo Without Frame   

Edit caption:


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Photo by: Rick Willis · See photo in original gallery.

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