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Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero/Reisen/Zeke...  HISTORY  Completed in May 1943, Zero No 61-120 was the 2,357th aircraft of its type to come off the Nakajima production line and was first assigned to the Japanese Naval Air Corps on the home island of Honshu. In a few months, it moved to Iwo Jima, then in March 1944, was reassigned to Asilito Airfield on Saipan.  On June 18, 1944, U.S. Marines captured Asilito Airfield with a number of intact Zero fighters. A dozen of these intact Zeros were shipped to NAS North Island, San Diego, California, USA for evaluation. Four Zeros were restored to flight, two went to the Army Air Force and two were retained by the Navy.  The Museum’s Zero No 61-120 was ferried to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland on August 23, 1944 and subsequently flown by about 25 different USN, USMC, Royal Navy and civilian fighter and test pilots, including Charles A. Lindbergh. The aircraft was ferried back to San Diego on January 11, 1945, where frontline combat pilots were also given a chance to check out the Zero. Altogether, Zero No 61-120 logged over 190hr of flight time in the USA before being declared surplus after the war.  Zero No 61-120 wound up being sold for scrap, but Mr. Ed Maloney obtained it in 1951 for his Air Museum in Claremont, CA, which opened in 1957.  The Museum began restoring the Zero to flying condition in 1973 and after 4½ years it flew again on June 28, 1978.  DISTINCTION  The Museum’s Zero is the only fully authentic flyable example in the world.  Restored to flying condition in June 1978, this Zero fighter is still powered by its original Nakajima Sakae 31 engine.  It carries the same color scheme and markings it bore in combat for the Imperial Japanese Navy during the war.  After a successful flight-test program the Zero was shipped to Japan for a six-month tour of flight demonstrations.  Two tours have been made in Japan and is the only example of the type of Zero to have flown in Japan since the end of WWII.  Once flown by Charles A. Lindbergh at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.  Movie and TV appearances include Pearl Harbor, Tora Tora Tora  http://planesoffame.org/  Planes of Fame Air Show, May 3-4, 2014 Chino Airport Chino, CA
August 30, 2009 - "1941 Ford Super Deluxe"    This was shot at the Palm Springs Air Museum.  The SOOC had so many distracting reflections that I could not work around.  So, I thought I would push this beautiful stock '41 Ford to this extreme.  I do not see to many candy apple red cars around anymore :)      I just competed a gallery with the SOOC and several other cars from the museum.    http://dakotacowboy.smugmug.com/Cars/Palm-Springs-Air-Museum-Cars/9405377_H6KiD/1/630121733_CxF5M    Airplanes from the museum are at another gallery     http://dakotacowboy.smugmug.com/Military/Palm-Springs-Air-Museum-2009/8329002_YUVa2/1/578640610_Q5Nsr
I took this picture at an exhibition of Eduard Munch's drawings. Was awarded gold medal from our national Photographic Society
April 27, 2009  Early Morning Fog...
2-02: This is another from Saturday's sunset. Several people have asked if the colors are real (natural) in yesterday's. It was taken as three bracketed exposures but only at -1, 0 and 1. Then combined in Photomatix. Then final processing in Capture NX2 (mostly brightness and focus adjustments) I didn't change any colors. I did actually have to desaturate a little because the orange and reds tend to be over saturated sometimes. I used the same processing on today's post. This one was actually taken a few minutes before the one I posted yesterday, so the clouds are more orange than red or pink
W for Winter and low sun over the North Sea.  Kresten Refslund
Skyline: This is part of the Boston Skyline as viewed from the Rose Kennedy Greenway. The greenway is a park (About 1 1/2 miles in length) which now occupies the spot of the former elevated highway (I95) which carved it's way through the city,  separating the North End from the rest of the city. The elevated highway was taken down back in the 90's and relocated underground in one of the most massive and costly public works projects in the nation's history. ($22 billion dollars)  The original cost of the project was projected to be about $3 Billion dollars and was slated for completion by 1998. The project was finally finished in 2007 and a cost of $14.6 billion and rising. The final tally was approximated to be $22 billion by the time the dust settles. Our children's, children's, children will still be paying for this.   07/23/2014
This road runs east of Sierra Nevada and 5 km south of Mono Lake.  Kresten Refslund
7-23-14. Green Treefrog. Gainesville, Florida. 2014.
7/23/2014 ~ An Ancient Tree  The Angel Oak Tree, a Southern Live Oak, is estimated to be in excess of 400-500 years old, stands 66.5 ft (20 m) tall, measures 28 ft (8.5 m) in circumference, and produces shade that covers 17,200 square feet (1,600 meters). From tip to tip Its longest branch distance is 187 ft.  St Johns Island, South Carolina  Thank you for the nice comments on yesterday's St John's Cathedral shot!
"Heavenly Swing"   “The best kind of friend is the kind you can sit on a porch swing with, never say a word, then walk away feeling like it was the best conversation that you ever had.”~Anonymous~
"Lonely Horse"     All things appear and disappear because of the concurrence of causes and conditions. Nothing ever exists entirely alone; everything is in relation to everything else.” ~Buddha~
September 23, 2007    Fog in the forest.
11/05/09 - Historic Yates Mill Pond at Sunset  I posted a picture of the actual water wheel in my gallery earlier this year.  In this picture, you can't see the wheel, but you get this lovely reflection instead.  After Joey's flu shot, I decided to make the best of a wonderful afternoon and go for a quick hike around the mill pond.  Unfortunately, we were really there a good 30-60 minutes too late to be taking good pictures.  I had to bump up the saturation on this one to improve the color.      This is the same shot taken on 10/26 last year when the sun was better and the tree closest to the mill still had yellow leaves on it.  http://fotomom.smugmug.com/Yates-Mill-Pond/Yates-Mill-Photo-Contest-2009/7088136_34LZC#454338880_TdGL2  In both cases, the sky looks better in the reflection than in the final shot.  I'm not sure how to get around that...especially in last night's picture when the sky really didn't have much blue in it.      We still have not had a frost or freeze at my house, but it look like it's coming Friday night into Saturday.  I am storing ceramic bird baths and pots and taking in fragile plants that I can save.      I sure wish today was Friday...  HAGD,  Maryann
March 31, 2009...  After the storm.
Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero/Reisen/Zeke...

HISTORY

Completed in May 1943, Zero No 61-120 was the 2,357th aircraft of its type to come off the Nakajima production line and was first assigned to the Japanese Naval Air Corps on the home island of Honshu. In a few months, it moved to Iwo Jima, then in March 1944, was reassigned to Asilito Airfield on Saipan.

On June 18, 1944, U.S. Marines captured Asilito Airfield with a number of intact Zero fighters. A dozen of these intact Zeros were shipped to NAS North Island, San Diego, California, USA for evaluation. Four Zeros were restored to flight, two went to the Army Air Force and two were retained by the Navy.

The Museum’s Zero No 61-120 was ferried to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland on August 23, 1944 and subsequently flown by about 25 different USN, USMC, Royal Navy and civilian fighter and test pilots, including Charles A. Lindbergh. The aircraft was ferried back to San Diego on January 11, 1945, where frontline combat pilots were also given a chance to check out the Zero. Altogether, Zero No 61-120 logged over 190hr of flight time in the USA before being declared surplus after the war.

Zero No 61-120 wound up being sold for scrap, but Mr. Ed Maloney obtained it in 1951 for his Air Museum in Claremont, CA, which opened in 1957.

The Museum began restoring the Zero to flying condition in 1973 and after 4½ years it flew again on June 28, 1978.

DISTINCTION

The Museum’s Zero is the only fully authentic flyable example in the world.

Restored to flying condition in June 1978, this Zero fighter is still powered by its original Nakajima Sakae 31 engine. It carries the same color scheme and markings it bore in combat for the Imperial Japanese Navy during the war.

After a successful flight-test program the Zero was shipped to Japan for a six-month tour of flight demonstrations. Two tours have been made in Japan and is the only example of the type of Zero to have flown in Japan since the end of WWII.

Once flown by Charles A. Lindbergh at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

Movie and TV appearances include Pearl Harbor, Tora Tora Tora http://planesoffame.org/

Planes of Fame Air Show, May 3-4, 2014
Chino Airport
Chino, CA

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Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero/Reisen/Zeke...  HISTORY  Completed in May 1943, Zero No 61-120 was the 2,357th aircraft of its type to come off the Nakajima production line and was first assigned to the Japanese Naval Air Corps on the home island of Honshu. In a few months, it moved to Iwo Jima, then in March 1944, was reassigned to Asilito Airfield on Saipan.  On June 18, 1944, U.S. Marines captured Asilito Airfield with a number of intact Zero fighters. A dozen of these intact Zeros were shipped to NAS North Island, San Diego, California, USA for evaluation. Four Zeros were restored to flight, two went to the Army Air Force and two were retained by the Navy.  The Museum’s Zero No 61-120 was ferried to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland on August 23, 1944 and subsequently flown by about 25 different USN, USMC, Royal Navy and civilian fighter and test pilots, including Charles A. Lindbergh. The aircraft was ferried back to San Diego on January 11, 1945, where frontline combat pilots were also given a chance to check out the Zero. Altogether, Zero No 61-120 logged over 190hr of flight time in the USA before being declared surplus after the war.  Zero No 61-120 wound up being sold for scrap, but Mr. Ed Maloney obtained it in 1951 for his Air Museum in Claremont, CA, which opened in 1957.  The Museum began restoring the Zero to flying condition in 1973 and after 4½ years it flew again on June 28, 1978.  DISTINCTION  The Museum’s Zero is the only fully authentic flyable example in the world.  Restored to flying condition in June 1978, this Zero fighter is still powered by its original Nakajima Sakae 31 engine.  It carries the same color scheme and markings it bore in combat for the Imperial Japanese Navy during the war.  After a successful flight-test program the Zero was shipped to Japan for a six-month tour of flight demonstrations.  Two tours have been made in Japan and is the only example of the type of Zero to have flown in Japan since the end of WWII.  Once flown by Charles A. Lindbergh at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.  Movie and TV appearances include Pearl Harbor, Tora Tora Tora  http://planesoffame.org/  Planes of Fame Air Show, May 3-4, 2014 Chino Airport Chino, CA
Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero/Reisen/Zeke...

HISTORY

Completed in May 1943, Zero No 61-120 was the 2,357th aircraft of its type to come off the Nakajima production line and was first assigned to the Japanese Naval Air Corps on the home island of Honshu. In a few months, it moved to Iwo Jima, then in March 1944, was reassigned to Asilito Airfield on Saipan.

On June 18, 1944, U.S. Marines captured Asilito Airfield with a number of intact Zero fighters. A dozen of these intact Zeros were shipped to NAS North Island, San Diego, California, USA for evaluation. Four Zeros were restored to flight, two went to the Army Air Force and two were retained by the Navy.

The Museum’s Zero No 61-120 was ferried to NAS Patuxent River, Maryland on August 23, 1944 and subsequently flown by about 25 different USN, USMC, Royal Navy and civilian fighter and test pilots, including Charles A. Lindbergh. The aircraft was ferried back to San Diego on January 11, 1945, where frontline combat pilots were also given a chance to check out the Zero. Altogether, Zero No 61-120 logged over 190hr of flight time in the USA before being declared surplus after the war.

Zero No 61-120 wound up being sold for scrap, but Mr. Ed Maloney obtained it in 1951 for his Air Museum in Claremont, CA, which opened in 1957.

The Museum began restoring the Zero to flying condition in 1973 and after 4½ years it flew again on June 28, 1978.

DISTINCTION

The Museum’s Zero is the only fully authentic flyable example in the world.

Restored to flying condition in June 1978, this Zero fighter is still powered by its original Nakajima Sakae 31 engine. It carries the same color scheme and markings it bore in combat for the Imperial Japanese Navy during the war.

After a successful flight-test program the Zero was shipped to Japan for a six-month tour of flight demonstrations. Two tours have been made in Japan and is the only example of the type of Zero to have flown in Japan since the end of WWII.

Once flown by Charles A. Lindbergh at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

Movie and TV appearances include Pearl Harbor, Tora Tora Tora http://planesoffame.org/

Planes of Fame Air Show, May 3-4, 2014
Chino Airport
Chino, CA

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Photo by: Howard · See photo in original gallery.

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