DailyPhotos - Most Popular Today
October 1, 2014  The church/school building and the home of Alonzo Russell are two of the perhaps 1/2 dozen buildings that are still standing in the ghost town of Grafton, UT.  These two buildings are in the process of being restored to their original condition of the mid to late 1800s.  We were so lucky to have encountered a retired gentleman there who was an architect and a member of the perservation board for the Grafton township.  He opened the gates and gave us and a young German couple access to the site, and he allowed us to go into the church and the home.  The church/school is complete in it's renovation, and the home's exterior is done, but the interior restoration is in progress.  He was most interesting & gave us a great history of the town and it's inhabitants.  The interior of the two-story home (unrestored) was fascinating to me.  The stairway was square and had two landings (turns) and the upstairs had 2 rooms.  The doorway between the two upstairs rooms was not very tall, and Bill (at 6' 4") had to stoop to step through.  The buildings still standing in tree-lined fields near the Virgin River just south of Zion National Park are fascinating.  Nearby there is a well-preserved cemetery with many graves dating from the 1860s.  Grafton was established in 1859, to provide a settlement for people to grow cotton on the fertile plains next to the Virgin River. By 1864 there was 168 people living in Grafton.  Frequent floods and Indian attacks caused problems for early pioneers, but some persisted and the town became quite successful, lasting until the 1930s when most of the residents moved away to better land.  The last resident left in 1945.    Although the danger from the Indians persisted during the town's growth period and beyond, the town did develop friends of a few American Indians.  These beloved allies lived amongst the settlers and fought with them against Indian attacks.  In the small cemetary nearby, there are approximately 10 graves of Native Americans that were friends of the settlers.  One was called Cedar Pete and another Wiley (son of Poinkum and Mary).  The church/schoolhouse was built in 1886, and home in the background was built in 1862. The site of the old town is quite atmospheric and authentic, with peaceful surroundings and the high, colorful cliffs of the national park that provide a dramatic backdrop to the north.  "The past is a ghost, the future a dream, and all we ever have is now."  ~ Bill Cosby  Have a restorative day today my friends!  Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com
Oct.1.  Abstract of the columns of the side of the White House seen from the roof top restaurant of the Washington Hotel.  Washington DC.
10/1/14 - My favorite Dale Chihuly glass sculpture at the Denver Botanic Garden; this one is all glass and has small polkadots on it that you can see in the largest size.  I really liked this comp and the reflections!  Thanks for your feedback on my shot of the glass container and the paper divider.  I'm glad so many of you liked it.
10-1-14
October 1, 2014  Fall is here and so are the mums…..
Oct 1 - Walking Through  I was taking senior pictures in this railroad underpass when it was raining outside when this person wanted to get by.  We stopped shooting so he could pass and I saw an image I wanted to capture and took this quickly.  I love the umbrella and the light and the movement of his legs.  Thanks for commenting on my sunflower image I posted yesterday!
10-01-2014 - Old Airman that worked the Flight Line...         Link to Photo  Without Frame
October 1, 2014  Sunrise on Padre Island
Wednesday, October 1, 2014  "RUSTIC ORANGE COLEUS LEAVES" (Solenostemon scutellarioides, Vulcan)  "I sit in my garden, gazing upon a beauty that cannot gaze upon itself, and I find sufficient purpose for my day." ~ Robert Brault  October, already? Where did September go? Time is really flying (use of personification here).   Despite the fact that the sun was beaming in Atlanta (aka "HOTlanta"), it was a beautiful day. I really like the color combination of the leaves, as well as how the sun is emitting the leaves on the left more. In hindsight, I probably should have cropped out the green leaf that's playing peek-a-boo at the bottom. Conversely, I am not the least bit disturbed. In the words of Elizabeth Jacob (aka arctangent) regarding my "Sushi Sofa" photo on September 18, 2014, and I concur, "Perfection isn't everything."  Have a wonderful Wednesday!  Atlanta Botanical Gardens 1345 Piedmont Avenue NE Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Official website: http://www.atlantabotanicalgarden.org  (photo taken 7/26/2014)  My Homepage: http://www.Godschild.smugmug.com
A sign that addiction can effect people at any age.  The purple ribbon indicates that the individual has been in recovery for more than 10 years and the large button shows that the child  has for 2 years.
30.09.14 - The Two Towers  This is from my guided photo walk last night, I took it quickly to iilustrate strange viewpoints and composition so it isn't perfect by any means. To get this shot you have to lay on your back or the towers won't fit into the archway on the left. You can get a portrait orientation shot of just the towers framed by the archway, and I've used that as a Daily before, but I also like this composition showing the ornate ceiling as well. In a tourist city like Lincoln it is difficult finding shots that haven't been seen a million times before, so it is a constant challenge for me and I try to encourage others to think out of the box occasionally.
I had 2 different shots to chose from in this mini-series and I was torn as to which one to post so I chose to post both of them today. Here's the first one....  10/01/2014
A favorite fall sight is the vividly colored Virginia Creeper that festoons so many trees and shrubs in my area.  This year seems especially good for color in these vines.  Although the back lighting somewhat bleached the color, seeing so many trees together in their viney finery was irresistible.  DP274-2014  Posted October 1; processed ditto  Taken September 29 at Hidden Lake Gardens  Title:  Vineland
Hanging on  Oct 1 A dragonfly hanging on to a twig during a slight breeze. Managed to get a shot between breezes!
Mongolian acrobat, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia    Out in the back of beyond for the next few days, so no electricity, no commenting, no posting....total withdrawal!    01/10/14 www.allenfotowild.com
October 1, 2014

The church/school building and the home of Alonzo Russell are two of the perhaps 1/2 dozen buildings that are still standing in the ghost town of Grafton, UT. These two buildings are in the process of being restored to their original condition of the mid to late 1800s. We were so lucky to have encountered a retired gentleman there who was an architect and a member of the perservation board for the Grafton township. He opened the gates and gave us and a young German couple access to the site, and he allowed us to go into the church and the home. The church/school is complete in it's renovation, and the home's exterior is done, but the interior restoration is in progress. He was most interesting & gave us a great history of the town and it's inhabitants.

The interior of the two-story home (unrestored) was fascinating to me. The stairway was square and had two landings (turns) and the upstairs had 2 rooms. The doorway between the two upstairs rooms was not very tall, and Bill (at 6' 4") had to stoop to step through.

The buildings still standing in tree-lined fields near the Virgin River just south of Zion National Park are fascinating. Nearby there is a well-preserved cemetery with many graves dating from the 1860s.

Grafton was established in 1859, to provide a settlement for people to grow cotton on the fertile plains next to the Virgin River. By 1864 there was 168 people living in Grafton.

Frequent floods and Indian attacks caused problems for early pioneers, but some persisted and the town became quite successful, lasting until the 1930s when most of the residents moved away to better land. The last resident left in 1945.

Although the danger from the Indians persisted during the town's growth period and beyond, the town did develop friends of a few American Indians. These beloved allies lived amongst the settlers and fought with them against Indian attacks. In the small cemetary nearby, there are approximately 10 graves of Native Americans that were friends of the settlers. One was called Cedar Pete and another Wiley (son of Poinkum and Mary).

The church/schoolhouse was built in 1886, and home in the background was built in 1862. The site of the old town is quite atmospheric and authentic, with peaceful surroundings and the high, colorful cliffs of the national park that provide a dramatic backdrop to the north.

"The past is a ghost, the future a dream, and all we ever have is now." ~ Bill Cosby

Have a restorative day today my friends!

Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
October 1, 2014  The church/school building and the home of Alonzo Russell are two of the perhaps 1/2 dozen buildings that are still standing in the ghost town of Grafton, UT.  These two buildings are in the process of being restored to their original condition of the mid to late 1800s.  We were so lucky to have encountered a retired gentleman there who was an architect and a member of the perservation board for the Grafton township.  He opened the gates and gave us and a young German couple access to the site, and he allowed us to go into the church and the home.  The church/school is complete in it's renovation, and the home's exterior is done, but the interior restoration is in progress.  He was most interesting & gave us a great history of the town and it's inhabitants.  The interior of the two-story home (unrestored) was fascinating to me.  The stairway was square and had two landings (turns) and the upstairs had 2 rooms.  The doorway between the two upstairs rooms was not very tall, and Bill (at 6' 4") had to stoop to step through.  The buildings still standing in tree-lined fields near the Virgin River just south of Zion National Park are fascinating.  Nearby there is a well-preserved cemetery with many graves dating from the 1860s.  Grafton was established in 1859, to provide a settlement for people to grow cotton on the fertile plains next to the Virgin River. By 1864 there was 168 people living in Grafton.  Frequent floods and Indian attacks caused problems for early pioneers, but some persisted and the town became quite successful, lasting until the 1930s when most of the residents moved away to better land.  The last resident left in 1945.    Although the danger from the Indians persisted during the town's growth period and beyond, the town did develop friends of a few American Indians.  These beloved allies lived amongst the settlers and fought with them against Indian attacks.  In the small cemetary nearby, there are approximately 10 graves of Native Americans that were friends of the settlers.  One was called Cedar Pete and another Wiley (son of Poinkum and Mary).  The church/schoolhouse was built in 1886, and home in the background was built in 1862. The site of the old town is quite atmospheric and authentic, with peaceful surroundings and the high, colorful cliffs of the national park that provide a dramatic backdrop to the north.  "The past is a ghost, the future a dream, and all we ever have is now."  ~ Bill Cosby  Have a restorative day today my friends!  Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com
October 1, 2014

The church/school building and the home of Alonzo Russell are two of the perhaps 1/2 dozen buildings that are still standing in the ghost town of Grafton, UT. These two buildings are in the process of being restored to their original condition of the mid to late 1800s. We were so lucky to have encountered a retired gentleman there who was an architect and a member of the perservation board for the Grafton township. He opened the gates and gave us and a young German couple access to the site, and he allowed us to go into the church and the home. The church/school is complete in it's renovation, and the home's exterior is done, but the interior restoration is in progress. He was most interesting & gave us a great history of the town and it's inhabitants.

The interior of the two-story home (unrestored) was fascinating to me. The stairway was square and had two landings (turns) and the upstairs had 2 rooms. The doorway between the two upstairs rooms was not very tall, and Bill (at 6' 4") had to stoop to step through.

The buildings still standing in tree-lined fields near the Virgin River just south of Zion National Park are fascinating. Nearby there is a well-preserved cemetery with many graves dating from the 1860s.

Grafton was established in 1859, to provide a settlement for people to grow cotton on the fertile plains next to the Virgin River. By 1864 there was 168 people living in Grafton.

Frequent floods and Indian attacks caused problems for early pioneers, but some persisted and the town became quite successful, lasting until the 1930s when most of the residents moved away to better land. The last resident left in 1945.

Although the danger from the Indians persisted during the town's growth period and beyond, the town did develop friends of a few American Indians. These beloved allies lived amongst the settlers and fought with them against Indian attacks. In the small cemetary nearby, there are approximately 10 graves of Native Americans that were friends of the settlers. One was called Cedar Pete and another Wiley (son of Poinkum and Mary).

The church/schoolhouse was built in 1886, and home in the background was built in 1862. The site of the old town is quite atmospheric and authentic, with peaceful surroundings and the high, colorful cliffs of the national park that provide a dramatic backdrop to the north.

"The past is a ghost, the future a dream, and all we ever have is now." ~ Bill Cosby

Have a restorative day today my friends!

Linda http://lgood.smugmug.com

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
Photo by: Lgood · See photo in original gallery.

Comments

|


StatCounter - Free Web Tracker and Counter