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Looking down the Devil's Throat (Garganta do Diabo).  Yesterday I took a helicopter ride over Iguazu Falls and was able to open the window and shoot out.  We went on the first flight of the day at 9 am, and at that time there was a high overcast, perfect for photographing the falls and avoiding blown out highlights from the sun reflecting off the water.  The Iguazu River cascades over the edge of the Paraná Plateau in a series of 150-300 waterfalls, depending on the water level.  Right now the water is high due to recent rains. The edge of the plateau is 2700 m long (1.7 mi) and the individual waterfalls vary in height from 60 to 82 m (197 to 269 ft). Approximately half of the river's flow falls into a long horse-shoe shaped chasm called the Devil's Throat, depicted in this image. At the upper right you can see the ruins of the walkway to Devil's Throat on the Argentinian side of the falls, which were destroyed during record rainfalls and flooding in June of this year. Iguazu Falls are a spectacular sight; they are a UNESO World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Wonders of the World.  A wonderful ending to my first trip to Brazil!  21/11/14 www.allenfotowild.com
11-22-2014 - Thistle at Mesa Verde - Cortez, CO         Link to Photo  Without Frame  
Sunshine on a cold day. My back deck. 22/11/14
I've seen a number of creatures occupy this denning hole.  The tree stands about 25 ft off our back deck.  During family rearing season if it's occupied at all, it's home to raccoons.  But come winter, squirrels of all types come and go, depending on the weather, and some birds, primarily nuthatches and downy woodpeckers, seem to use it for food storage.  Yesterday, for the first time, there was an eastern screech owl perched at the opening.  A grey squirrel, or possibly a hybrid between grey and fox squirrels, if there is such a thing, was checking out the owl, and getting the 'stink eye' back from the owl.  I chose this shot, rather than one with the owl's head swiveled as it looked at the squirrel, because I think the owl's face is more interesting than the back of its head.  One 'encounter shot' is here:  http://smu.gs/1v9B8pS  DP326-2014  Posted late Saturday, November 22; processed ditto from a shot taken November 21 Many of you may routinely see owls in the wild.  This was a first for me, and quite unexpected.  So it was a thrill.  All the owls I'd seen 'til then had been in zoos, rehabilitation centers, or at the Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson.  Title:  Squatter's Rights - Screech Owl and Squirrel  Yesterday evening was another black hole for wifi signal in my computer room.  Today has been just as bad.  I'll try to get some commenting done sometime today.  Thanks to all of you who left comments to my red/green shot yesterday.
Damselfly - taken in July near Olympia, Wa.
November 22, 2014   Welcome to Antigua.
11/22/14 - Amaranth; I really like all the detail in these flowers; check it out in the largest size.  Thanks for your comments on my Studebaker shot;  The surgery went well; I have a patch over the eye which will be removed tomorrow morning.  It is going to take a bit of doing to get the reading glasses for books and the computer but I should be set in a couple of days.
11-22-14 Early morning commute.
Nov. 22.  Old Barn in the Fall.
Chicago Riverwalk
1936/48 Delahaye 135S/175S
11-22-2014 "Flying Around"  Birds circling around just enjoying life.  Thank you for comments on my photos. Donna
11.22.14  Taken around 1966 at my Aunt Shirley's house in Utah. The elderly man is my grandfather, Francis Sivereen Johnson. Girls, top left--Dawn (cousin), Me, Undrea (cousin--sister of Dawn), Kelly (cousin--deceased). Bottom from left--Robyn (my sister), Lynn (cousin--sister to Kelly). And the dog is BoBo.  This is another photo I've scanned. The original was a slide, which I made copies of when I was 17 and gave to family members for Christmas.   My dad always shot slides. I remember when he'd get a bunch developed we'd sit down and have a slide show. That was perfectly normal to me. He never made copies, so  his photos were kind of hard to share. I think he even took the projector and slide trays with us when we went back to Utah on vacation. I imagine a few relatives thought, "Oh, no, here comes Joe and we will have to sit through another slide show." Each Summer he spent two weeks hiking in the Sierras with his scouts and, of course, he took his Kodak Motormatic camera with him. He usually took the camera for other scouting things and I remember sitting in the audience many times during court of honors when they did a slide show. Those were the times I am sure his slides were appreciated.  The Kodak Motormatic was the first camera I ever used. At the age of seven I fell in love with images in my mind and asked my dad if I could take some pictures to record those images. Many cameras later, I am still shooting and in love with photography.
21.11.14 - Heading Home  This is actually from a couple of days ago, but it could easily have been from yesterday which was grey and wet too. The weather seems to be alternating between beautiful sunny autumn days and miserable rainy ones at the moment. If I finish work early enough I try and get Willis up the hill before it gets dark, but we usually end up heading back home in the gathering gloom. Here it was much darker than it looks in the photo, hence the city lights coming on in the distance.
Fallen Leaves...  Fullerton Arboretum Fullerton, CA  Thank you for you views and comments, much appreciated! Critiques welcome...  22 November 2014
Looking down the Devil's Throat (Garganta do Diabo).

Yesterday I took a helicopter ride over Iguazu Falls and was able to open the window and shoot out. We went on the first flight of the day at 9 am, and at that time there was a high overcast, perfect for photographing the falls and avoiding blown out highlights from the sun reflecting off the water.

The Iguazu River cascades over the edge of the Paraná Plateau in a series of 150-300 waterfalls, depending on the water level. Right now the water is high due to recent rains. The edge of the plateau is 2700 m long (1.7 mi) and the individual waterfalls vary in height from 60 to 82 m (197 to 269 ft). Approximately half of the river's flow falls into a long horse-shoe shaped chasm called the Devil's Throat, depicted in this image. At the upper right you can see the ruins of the walkway to Devil's Throat on the Argentinian side of the falls, which were destroyed during record rainfalls and flooding in June of this year. Iguazu Falls are a spectacular sight; they are a UNESO World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Wonders of the World. A wonderful ending to my first trip to Brazil!

21/11/14 http://www.allenfotowild.com

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Looking down the Devil's Throat (Garganta do Diabo).  Yesterday I took a helicopter ride over Iguazu Falls and was able to open the window and shoot out.  We went on the first flight of the day at 9 am, and at that time there was a high overcast, perfect for photographing the falls and avoiding blown out highlights from the sun reflecting off the water.  The Iguazu River cascades over the edge of the Paraná Plateau in a series of 150-300 waterfalls, depending on the water level.  Right now the water is high due to recent rains. The edge of the plateau is 2700 m long (1.7 mi) and the individual waterfalls vary in height from 60 to 82 m (197 to 269 ft). Approximately half of the river's flow falls into a long horse-shoe shaped chasm called the Devil's Throat, depicted in this image. At the upper right you can see the ruins of the walkway to Devil's Throat on the Argentinian side of the falls, which were destroyed during record rainfalls and flooding in June of this year. Iguazu Falls are a spectacular sight; they are a UNESO World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Wonders of the World.  A wonderful ending to my first trip to Brazil!  21/11/14 www.allenfotowild.com
Looking down the Devil's Throat (Garganta do Diabo).

Yesterday I took a helicopter ride over Iguazu Falls and was able to open the window and shoot out. We went on the first flight of the day at 9 am, and at that time there was a high overcast, perfect for photographing the falls and avoiding blown out highlights from the sun reflecting off the water.

The Iguazu River cascades over the edge of the Paraná Plateau in a series of 150-300 waterfalls, depending on the water level. Right now the water is high due to recent rains. The edge of the plateau is 2700 m long (1.7 mi) and the individual waterfalls vary in height from 60 to 82 m (197 to 269 ft). Approximately half of the river's flow falls into a long horse-shoe shaped chasm called the Devil's Throat, depicted in this image. At the upper right you can see the ruins of the walkway to Devil's Throat on the Argentinian side of the falls, which were destroyed during record rainfalls and flooding in June of this year. Iguazu Falls are a spectacular sight; they are a UNESO World Heritage Site and one of the Seven Wonders of the World. A wonderful ending to my first trip to Brazil!

21/11/14 http://www.allenfotowild.com

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Photo by: Terry Allen · See photo in original gallery.

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