DailyPhotos - Most Popular Today
A well dressed bankhar dog with a nice 'smile' (but don't let the smile fool you, see below)  There were some great working dogs in Mongolia, but they weren't pets, and not friendly towards strangers.  They spend their lives as guardians of the flocks.  At the working ger (round tent-like dwelling) where I stayed they were tied to a post during the day and were quite vicious if you tried to approach them.  The flocks of sheep, cows and goats come in close to the gers at night and the dogs are usually allowed to roam loose at night to deter predators....which made going out at night a bit scary.  Bankhars are also called Tibetan mastiffs.  They are an ancient breed of dog that guard the flocks of goats and sheep and other livestock and also guard the gers and other dwellings.  They are not true mastiffs (mastiffs in the native language just means 'big dog').  This one is an example of a Do-khyi or "nomad" type of bankhar, which are smaller.  The Tsang-khyi  or 'monastery' type can be born in the same litter and are much larger and heavier, and these are the ones more commonly associated with the Tibetan mastiff seen at dog shows in the West.  Some photos of a mounted Mongolian herder driving his horses across the steppes can be seen here (best larger), and also some photos of a mountain area where there were actually some trees (the steppes are treeless): http://goo.gl/8bhGRR  26/12/14 www.allelnfotowild.com
Immature Red-tailed Hawk - taken near Olympia, Wa.  I really appreciate the comments!
A well dressed bankhar dog with a nice 'smile' (but don't let the smile fool you, see below)

There were some great working dogs in Mongolia, but they weren't pets, and not friendly towards strangers. They spend their lives as guardians of the flocks. At the working ger (round tent-like dwelling) where I stayed they were tied to a post during the day and were quite vicious if you tried to approach them. The flocks of sheep, cows and goats come in close to the gers at night and the dogs are usually allowed to roam loose at night to deter predators....which made going out at night a bit scary.

Bankhars are also called Tibetan mastiffs. They are an ancient breed of dog that guard the flocks of goats and sheep and other livestock and also guard the gers and other dwellings. They are not true mastiffs (mastiffs in the native language just means 'big dog'). This one is an example of a Do-khyi or "nomad" type of bankhar, which are smaller. The Tsang-khyi or 'monastery' type can be born in the same litter and are much larger and heavier, and these are the ones more commonly associated with the Tibetan mastiff seen at dog shows in the West.

Some photos of a mounted Mongolian herder driving his horses across the steppes can be seen here (best larger), and also some photos of a mountain area where there were actually some trees (the steppes are treeless): http://goo.gl/8bhGRR

26/12/14 http://www.allelnfotowild.com

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
A well dressed bankhar dog with a nice 'smile' (but don't let the smile fool you, see below)  There were some great working dogs in Mongolia, but they weren't pets, and not friendly towards strangers.  They spend their lives as guardians of the flocks.  At the working ger (round tent-like dwelling) where I stayed they were tied to a post during the day and were quite vicious if you tried to approach them.  The flocks of sheep, cows and goats come in close to the gers at night and the dogs are usually allowed to roam loose at night to deter predators....which made going out at night a bit scary.  Bankhars are also called Tibetan mastiffs.  They are an ancient breed of dog that guard the flocks of goats and sheep and other livestock and also guard the gers and other dwellings.  They are not true mastiffs (mastiffs in the native language just means 'big dog').  This one is an example of a Do-khyi or "nomad" type of bankhar, which are smaller.  The Tsang-khyi  or 'monastery' type can be born in the same litter and are much larger and heavier, and these are the ones more commonly associated with the Tibetan mastiff seen at dog shows in the West.  Some photos of a mounted Mongolian herder driving his horses across the steppes can be seen here (best larger), and also some photos of a mountain area where there were actually some trees (the steppes are treeless): http://goo.gl/8bhGRR  26/12/14 www.allelnfotowild.com
A well dressed bankhar dog with a nice 'smile' (but don't let the smile fool you, see below)

There were some great working dogs in Mongolia, but they weren't pets, and not friendly towards strangers. They spend their lives as guardians of the flocks. At the working ger (round tent-like dwelling) where I stayed they were tied to a post during the day and were quite vicious if you tried to approach them. The flocks of sheep, cows and goats come in close to the gers at night and the dogs are usually allowed to roam loose at night to deter predators....which made going out at night a bit scary.

Bankhars are also called Tibetan mastiffs. They are an ancient breed of dog that guard the flocks of goats and sheep and other livestock and also guard the gers and other dwellings. They are not true mastiffs (mastiffs in the native language just means 'big dog'). This one is an example of a Do-khyi or "nomad" type of bankhar, which are smaller. The Tsang-khyi or 'monastery' type can be born in the same litter and are much larger and heavier, and these are the ones more commonly associated with the Tibetan mastiff seen at dog shows in the West.

Some photos of a mounted Mongolian herder driving his horses across the steppes can be seen here (best larger), and also some photos of a mountain area where there were actually some trees (the steppes are treeless): http://goo.gl/8bhGRR

26/12/14 http://www.allelnfotowild.com

Edit caption:


Save Cancel
Photo by: Terry Allen · See photo in original gallery.

Comments

|


StatCounter - Free Web Tracker and Counter