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A Secret Garden Mushrooms in the woods - I don't know what kind.
July 23 2014 Fishing Hall of Fame  That's a big muskie.  We went to this place yesterday in Hayward, Wisconsin.  I won't be able to comment while we're on the road but I'll catch up when we get back
July 23, 2014  - Masked Flyer,  very pleasant to listen to in the evening.
Skyline: This is part of the Boston Skyline as viewed from the Rose Kennedy Greenway. The greenway is a park (About 1 1/2 miles in length) which now occupies the spot of the former elevated highway (I95) which carved it's way through the city,  separating the North End from the rest of the city. The elevated highway was taken down back in the 90's and relocated underground in one of the most massive and costly public works projects in the nation's history. ($22 billion dollars)  The original cost of the project was projected to be about $3 Billion dollars and was slated for completion by 1998. The project was finally finished in 2007 and a cost of $14.6 billion and rising. The final tally was approximated to be $22 billion by the time the dust settles. Our children's, children's, children will still be paying for this.   07/23/2014
Osprey  Jul 23 A female osprey showing off its plumage.
July 23, 2014  One Foot Forward
07-23-2014 "Lots of Flowers"  A shot of another arrangement I had at the bridesmaid luncheon held at my house.  Thank you so much for the comments on the horse sculpture yesterday.  I always appreciate them so much. Donna
Port Hudson Marina
 IMG_0418-atp2
Hosta Posted July 23, 2014  Another from the Devonian Gardens near Edmonton.
07.24.14  Dragonfly  Indigo has seen live dragonflies all over the place lately but they are so elusive and rarely sit still--so, we stitched this charm onto Indigo while we were doing infusion. Tina liked the shadow.  Yesterday Tina made a quick trip into SLC to Huntsman (sans camera and Indigo) to pick up eight vials of nupogen for future use and injected the first one when she arrived home. YAY! The 2nd today. I guess they've decided to have me take it weekly until I am done with the taxol. I just want to get better. Whatever that takes.  The Boy and Tina may go to the Ogden Rodeo tonight--or not. It is so hard not being able to do the things we want to do. If not the rodeo, perhaps, the Ogden City Pioneer Days Parade on Thursday morning? Tina's ancestors were Mormon pioneers. The Gardner bunch entered the Salt Lake Valley on Oct. 1, 1847 with the 2nd wagon train and are attributed with having the first operating enterprise in the Salt Lake Valley.  Thanks to our friends who contributed to Jeddy's exodus to Utah. He got exactly as much as he needs to complete the trip here. He is 19 and is making a lot of sacrifices to make this move to be here with me, to help me. I pray that he will keep making his amazing music here.  Several people have asked me where they can send BLING! to Miss Indigo. Yes, I am still taking BLING! (and I feel the prayers, love and positive energy that also are sent my way) The people at Huntsman think Indigo is a great idea! YAY! My address here is: Tina Gardner, 4094 So. 950 W., Riverdale, UT 84405  Thanks!
July 23 2014  We were looking for the perfect canola field and came across this flax field.  It's a little unusual to see flax around here.
Republic P-47G Thunderbolt...  Out of the grand total of 15,660 P-47 Thunderbolts produced for the US Army Air Corps during World War Two, perhaps the least known operational versions were the Curtiss-built P-47Gs. In order to meet expanded wartime production goals for the P-47D Thunderbolt, the New York-based Republic Aviation Company built a second plant in Evansvile, Indiana and also licensed the Curtiss-Wright Company to produce the aeroplane under the P-47G designation. Between December 1942 and March 1944 Curtiss-Wright produced a total of 354 P-47G Thunderbolts which were identical to the Republic-built "razorback" P-47D models.  The P-47G was powered by a 2,300 h.p. Pratt and Whitney R-2800 18-cylinder radial air-cooled engine and could reach a top speed of 433 m.p.h. at an altitude of 30,000ft. The aircraft had a service ceiling of 40,000ft and a maximum climb rate of 2,750ft/min.  With an empty weight of 9,000lb, a normal loaded weight of 13,500lb and a maximum weight of 15,000lb, the Thunderbolt was the heaviest single-engined fighter of its day. It had a wingspan of 41ft, a length of 36ft and a height of nearly 15ft.  P-47G-15-CU No 42-25254 was contracted for in the 1942 fiscal year budget, and spent most of its military career as a fighter trainer in the western part of the USA. After the war, the Thunderbolt was used as an instructional airframe at Grand Central Airport in Glendale, California.  In 1952, Ed Maloney obtained the aircraft and stored it at his home with the intention of eventually displaying it in his projected air museum.  The Thunderbolt was finally reassembled at the Air Museum’s Ontario International Airport, California base in 1963 and took part in a number of west coast airshows until it was damaged in a forced landing at NAS Point Mugu, California, in 1971. Maloney then put the damaged aircraft into storage again until 1980 when it was restored to static display condition at the Museum’s new Planes of Fame location in Chino, California. Although the primary goal was to get the Thunderbolt back into flying condition, lack of a suitable replacement engine delayed that event until 1985.  With the prospect of a new engine becoming imminent, Steve Hinton’s Fighter Rebuilders crew, together with museum volunteer workers, began bringing the Thunderbolt up to flying condition again in early 1985. In May they finally took delivery of a custom-built R-2800 engine from John Sandberg’s JRS Enterprises, a Minneapolis, Minnesota-based company which specializes in engine overhauls for warbirds. The engine is fitted with a Hamilton Standard propeller, which is reportedly more reliable than the aircraft’s original Curtiss Electric unit, and for which spare parts are more readily available.  For increased reliability, Hinton’s crew also substituted TBM Avenger wheels and multiple disc brakes in place of the Thunderbolt’s original shoe brakes, and installed modern radio equipment. The aircraft’s starboard wing, which had been badly damaged in the forced landing at Point Mugu, was replaced with one from a postwar South American P-47D as part of a spare parts deal. To accommodate a passenger a jump seat was added behind the pilot’s seat.  Over the years, 42-25254 has appeared in a number of different colour schemes. During the war, it carried the standard Army Air Corps olive and grey camouflage scheme which was changed to a yellow and black finish when the aircraft was at Grand Central. In 1963 the Thunderbolt was painted in overall olive (not accurate) and carried the markings of the P-47D that was used by 56th Fighter Group ace Bud Mahurin. In 1968, the aircraft was repainted in olive and grey camouflage and carried the markings of 42-26387 Miss Behave, a 78th Fighter Group P-47 in World War Two. The Thunderbolt was restored to a natural metal finish in 1980 with the intention of eventually adding the markings of Penrod and Sam, the last operational P-47D which ace Robert S. Johnson flew with the 56th Fighter Group. However, when the Thunderbolt was finally restored to flying condition again, it reappeared in a very accurate paint scheme as 42-8487 Spirit of Atlantic City, N.J., Mahurin’s P-47D-5.  Carrying the civil registration NX3395G in very small characters, 42-25254 took to the air again after its latest restoration in mid-May 1985, just in time to make its debut in the Planes of Fame Air Museum’s sixth annual Planes of Fame Air Display at Chino Airport on May 18 and 19, 1985. http://planesoffame.org/  Planes of Fame Air Show, May 3-4, 2014 Chino Airport Chino, CA
A Secret Garden
Mushrooms in the woods - I don't know what kind.

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A Secret Garden Mushrooms in the woods - I don't know what kind.
A Secret Garden
Mushrooms in the woods - I don't know what kind.

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Photo by: Jerry Barton · See photo in original gallery.

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