Galway

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Recent Galleries

Macnas Parade 2008 - Galway Arts Festival : A set of pictures taken at the <a href="http://www.macnas.com/">Macnas</a> Parade on a warm, clear Sunday evening [July 20, 2008] during the 2008 Galway Arts Festival. As you'll see from the pictures, a huge crowd lined the streets of Galway to cheer on the parade, which began on Fr. Griffin road, crossed Wolfe Tone Bridge, went up Merchants road into Eyre Square, went down Eglington Street onto Wood Quay and finished up on the Dyke road.

Macnas Parade 2008 - Galway Arts Fest...

JOHN SMYTH

A set of pictures taken at the Macnas Parade on a warm, clear Sunday e ...

Updated: Jan 05, 2014 8:23am PST

Salthill Promenade, Galway : A series of pictures taken  by the Blackrock diving board at the end of the promenade in Salthill in Galway. The first nine pictures were taken just after the moon had risen over Galway Bay one evening in September 2007, the second page of pictures were taken at dawn one morning during October 2007 and the rest of the pictures were taken at various other time - if you hover the mouse over a picture and click on the 'i' symbol, it will show you the date it was taken.

The reason there are multiple versions of some images in the gallery is because those images are available with and without white border (and in some cases, 2 different sized border). 

When you click on the "buy" icon, you will see all available sizes for that image. For any image, the price of the "Gloss" and "Matt" finish is the same, and "Lustre" is more expensive (it is more expensive to print).

The copyright notice does not appear on the final print.

If you have any questions on a particular image, just leave a comment under the image and I will answer it for you.

Salthill Promenade, Galway

JOHN SMYTH

A series of pictures taken by the Blackrock diving board at the end o ...

Updated: Jan 05, 2014 8:13am PST

Inishbofin Island :

Inishbofin Island

JOHN SMYTH

Updated: Sep 03, 2012 10:47pm PST

Ballinasloe : Images from in and around Ballinsloe, in east Galway. Ballinasloe is famous for an open-air horse fair that takes place every October

Ballinasloe

JOHN SMYTH

Images from in and around Ballinsloe, in east Galway. Ballinasloe is f ...

Updated: Apr 12, 2011 5:26am PST

Spanish Arch : Images of the Spanish Arch, the Claddagh, South Park, the Galway Canal Basin and also Galway Harbour.

Spanish Arch

JOHN SMYTH

Images of the Spanish Arch, the Claddagh, South Park, the Galway Canal ...

Updated: Jan 25, 2011 1:24pm PST

Attymon : Scenes from the Graigabbey River that runs from near Attymon to Athenry in east Galway. Pictures taken during autumn of 2008 and 2009.

Attymon

JOHN SMYTH

Scenes from the Graigabbey River that runs from near Attymon to Athenr ...

Updated: Nov 15, 2009 12:17pm PST

Kilconnell : Kilconnell Friary is located on the old Dublin-to-Galway road, about 5 miles west of Ballinasloe. The friary is located just off the main street. The original site was founded by St. Conall in the sixth century, but the existing structure dates from the foundation of the Franciscan friary in 1353 by William O'Kelly, Lord of Hy Many. I've visited the Friary quite a few times over the years including <a href="http://www.monasette.com/archive/000080.html">2003</a>, <a href="http://johnsmyth.ie/blog/2008/12/11/kilconnell-friary-2/">2008</a> and  <a href="http://www.monasette.com/archive/001186.html">2009</a>.
There are a number of plaques within the friary, dating from the seventeenth century and bearing the crests of prominent families from the period.

Kilconnell

JOHN SMYTH

Kilconnell Friary is located on the old Dublin-to-Galway road, about 5 ...

Updated: Oct 04, 2009 7:17am PST

Ross Errily : The Franciscan Abbey of Ross Errily sits on the side of the Black river a few miles outside of Headford (25 km north of Galway city - take the road to Cong [R334] from Headford). It is an imposing sight, sitting on the flat countryside a few miles from the shore of Lough Corrib. The Friary was founded in 1351 by the Norman nobleman Sir Raymond de Burgo and, according to Harbison, 'is the most extensive and best preserved of all the Franciscan friaries in Ireland'. I wish I had visited it as a child - it is a maze of corridors, stairways, rooms and courtyards, and even now, I could feel the urge to go running and whooping around the site with a toy sword (which, when you think about it, is the least appropriate thing you could do in a Franciscan friary).

Even today, the friary, with its seventy-foot tower, dominates the landscape - the land is flat and probably prone to flooding. You cannot see the lake from the friary, but you can see the mountains that border the far side of the Corrib - the Partry mountains to the north, the Maumturks to the north west and the hills behind Oughterard to the west. When I first visited the friary in February of this year (2004), snow capped all of the mountains and a bitter wind that would bring more than a tear to your eye whipped off the lake.

Most of the friary was built during the latter half of the 15th century. Like many religious settlements in Ireland during the Middle Ages, it's fate was determined by the political tumult in England. It was dissolved in 1540 (when Henry VIII decided that he wounld't be a Roman Catholic anymore, and neither would any of his subjects) and in 1562, was granted to the Earl of Clanricarde. He made two attempts to restore the friarys to Ross Errily, in 1562 and 1580 but their residency was intermittent until 1664 when they were resident until 1765.

How did Ross Errily get it's name? Sir William Wilde (<a href="http://www.monasette.com/blog/references.htm#14">Ref 14</a>), quoting a translations of The Annals of the Four Masters, offers a couple of possibilities:-

"[in] AD1351, the monastery of Ros-Oirbhealagh [afterwards called Roserrilly] in the diocese of Tuam, was erected for Franciscans. and when, in 1604, Brian Oge O'Rourke was buried there, the name was changed to Ross-Iriala."

Ros-Oirbhealagh means wood of the eastern pass, and Ross-Iriala means wood of Irial (or perhaps Earl). But Sir William also offers another, more mythical explanation

"The building was commenced at Ross-daff, on the north or Mayo side of the river, when three swans came and perched on it, and having remained some time, flew to the other side with some ros, or flaxseed, which there grew up forthwith; and then the former structure was deserted and the present commenced, and called Ross-an-tree-Olla, "the flaxseed of the three swans", which, in course of years and mispronounciation of the language, became Ross-Errilly."

The reference to woodland might explain something that puzzles me about the site. In 1572, Fr. Ferrall McEgan (one of the friars) built a causeway of large stones from the entrance of the friary to the nearest point of dry ground - even a century ago, it was the only means of entering the friary. But, since most of the friary was at least one hundred years old at that point, the mystery is why the friars didn't built the causeway during the construction when it would have been more useful.

Unless they didn't need a causeway when they were building it. If the friary had been built in a wooded area, the land would have been reasonably dry ( the amount of stone that would have had to be carted in to build the friary would have required dry and sturdy paths). Subsequent deforestation might have caused the land to become wetter and more prone to flooding. And who could have cut down the trees? Well,it's possible that De Burgo might have had the trees felled. However, the friary itself would have required a good deal of timber, not only for construction (scaffolding, roofing, etc) but also for heating and cooking (the monks also probably smoked their own fish). By 1572, the friars had been on site for two hundred years, so they could have got through quite a few trees by then. Who knows how many times that, as the friars stood warming themselves around a blazing fire, their conversation turned to the encroachment of the surrounding marsh and how it seemed to be getting worse every year.

Ross Errily

JOHN SMYTH

The Franciscan Abbey of Ross Errily sits on the side of the Black rive ...

Updated: Jan 14, 2009 3:46pm PST

Kilmacduagh :

Kilmacduagh

JOHN SMYTH

Updated: Jan 03, 2009 2:13pm PST

Rahasane Turlough, near Craughwell : Pictures of the largest turlough in Ireland at Rahasane, near Craughwell in east Galway. In full flood, Rahasane covers about 250 hectares, and is host to thousand of migrant birds every winter. In 2008, heavy summer rain means that the turlough has filled early. A turlough is an Irish term for a seasonal lake; i.e. one that usually only fills in winter.

Rahasane Turlough, near Craughwell

JOHN SMYTH

Pictures of the largest turlough in Ireland at Rahasane, near Craughwe ...

Updated: Aug 24, 2008 1:07pm PST

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