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A P-51 Mustang ("Gunslinger") makes a high-speed pass.
An amazing patriot! Nickname "Wild Bill"; this was a life long friend of my fathers. He was born in Texas Sept of 1916. He was the last survivor of "the older guys", Dad's clan. Bill died January 2007. In 2003, fortunately, Bill wrote about his experience in WWII. The title: "My Five Years in WWII".  The picture you see here is the cover of his book. My father was the one who captured it. I was surprised as most of the Manila photos were ruined.  But that's "Wild Bill".  I salute you Sir!
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Soldiers from Company A, 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division search for weapons caches along the banks of the Euphrates River near Hit, Iraq.
Germany 1944
Rifles stood, covered by helmets and adorned with identification tags, between eight sets of boots to commemorate the Marines of BLT 2/1 who died during Operation Steel Curtain.
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A soldier stands before a car fire in Iraq.
The Changing of the Guard      The guard is changed every hour on the hour Oct. 1 to March 31 in an elaborate ritual. From April 1 through September 30, there are more than double the opportunities to view the change because another change is added on the half hour and the cemetery closing time moves from 5 to 7 p.m.     An impeccably uniformed relief commander appears on the plaza to announce the Changing of the Guard. Soon the new sentinel leaves the Quarters and unlocks the bolt of his or her M-14 rifle to signal to the relief commander to start the ceremony. The relief commander walks out to the Tomb and salutes, then faces the spectators and asks them to stand and stay silent during the ceremony.      The relief commander conducts a detailed white-glove inspection of the weapon, checking each part of the rifle once. Then, the relief commander and the relieving sentinel meet the retiring sentinel at the center of the matted path in front of the Tomb. All three salute the Unknowns who have been symbolically given the Medal of Honor. Then the relief commander orders the relieved sentinel, "Pass on your orders." The current sentinel commands, "Post and orders, remain as directed." The newly posted sentinel replies, "Orders acknowledged," and steps into position on the black mat. When the relief commander passes by, the new sentinel begins walking at a cadence of 90 steps per minute.      The Tomb Guard marches 21 steps down the black mat behind the Tomb, turns, faces east for 21 seconds, turns and faces north for 21 seconds, then takes 21 steps down the mat and repeats the process. After the turn, the sentinel executes a sharp "shoulder-arms" movement to place the weapon on the shoulder closest to the visitors to signify that the sentinel stands between the Tomb and any possible threat. Twenty-one was chosen because it symbolizes the highest military honor that can be bestowed -- the 21-gun salute.      Duty time when not "walking" is spent in the Tomb Guard Quarters below the Memorial Display Room of the Memorial Amphitheater where they study Cemetery "knowledge," clean their weapons and help the rest of their relief prepare for the Changing of the Guard. The guards also train on their days off.      The Guards of Honor at the Tomb of the Unknowns are highly motivated and are proud to honor all American service members who are "Known But to God."
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A P-51 Mustang ("Gunslinger") makes a high-speed pass.

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A P-51 Mustang ("Gunslinger") makes a high-speed pass.
A P-51 Mustang ("Gunslinger") makes a high-speed pass.

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Photo by: Richard · See photo in original gallery.

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