Railways - Page 2

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Class 70 : 9 photos

Class 70

MalsFotoFile

9 photos

Updated: Dec 17, 2014 4:10am PST

Abandoned Lines and Stations : A miscellaneous collection of photos of disused stations and lines throughout East Anglia. Some of these shots were taken nearly 40 years ago. A lot has changed in that time, Some of the stations no longer exist having disappeared under housing estates and road improvements. Bridges and other infrastructure are disappearing at an increasing rate, although some of the Victorian architecture has been preserved.  References used for dates and information unless otherwise stated,  Forgotten Railways (East Anglia) R.S. Joby and A Regional History of The Railways of Great Britain Volume 5 by Don Gordon.

Contributions to this album would be very welcome.

Other related sites:-

Berney Arms Web.  Railways in the Great Yarmouth area.   http://berneyarms.co.uk/html/yarmouth/rail/railway.htm

The Reshaping of The Stour Valley Line.  The effects of the closure of this line including a photo gallery.  http://stourline.co.uk

  Disused Stations Site.  Nick Catford's excellent resource..    http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/

Kings Lynn to Hunstanton you tube.    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lyp3wBqCuvE

Video from 1961 of a class 31 at Rodbridge level Crossing, Long Melford. on the Stour Valley Line.   http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/98971

Wisbech and Upwell Tramway. Film from 1961 http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/139644

Last Train From Aldeburgh. Silent film from 10th September 1966.  http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/517

Highly recommended. Excellent collection of disused stations on flickr here:-  http://www.flickr.com/photos/blue-pelican-railways/

Colour film from 1959 featuring The Cambridge to Mildenhall branch :-http://lode.ccan.co.uk/content/catalogue_item/cambridge-to-mildenhall-line-2

Facebook:-  Friendly Facebook discussion group here. https://www.facebook.com/groups/497395890391199/?fref=ts

  Colour film from the last day of the Cambridge to Sudbury line, taken between Pampisford and Haverhill. 4th March 1967 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DflFQ3wuqY

Abandoned Lines and Stations

eastanglianrailwayarchive

A miscellaneous collection of photos of disused stations and lines thr ...

Updated: Dec 15, 2014 6:50am PST

Britain's Favourite Diesel : Like them or loathe them, the EMD JT42CWR, better known as the class 66 or, thanks to that peaked roof, Shed has become a ubiquitous feature of the British railway scene, and is set to remain so for years to come. There can be few places on the national network which haven't seen a Shed at some time since their introduction in 1998. <br />
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Although built in Canada they originate from the US mid-west, from McCook in the Chicago suburbs, where the Electro-Motive Division of General Motors had their locomotive building plant, and where the prime mover for the 66 is still manufactured. The engine in the 66, a 12N-710-G3B-EC is a linear descendant of the first two stroke diesel developed specifically for rail use by the Winton Engine Company and Electromotive Corporation in 1938, the 567. The two companies, Winton &amp; EMC, had been bought by GM in 1929, they were merged in 1941 to form the Electromotive Division. <br />
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The 567 was succeeded by the 645 series in 1966 which in turn was superseded by the 710 in 1984. The numbers incidentally refer to the cubic capacity (in cu inches) of each cylinder. Two stroke technology was adopted by Winton in the early 1930s on the back of research money from the US government into improved submarine engine designs. It offered the promise of greater power for a given weight of engine block than could be obtained from contemporary four stroke engines. Although less fuel efficient than four strokes, EMD have stuck with their two stroke designs now for over 70 years, each succeeding type being more powerful, and more efficient whilst emitting fewer pollutants, than its predecessor. In the North American market EMD had, by 1969, seen off almost all their competitors; Fairbanks-Morse, Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton and Alco. Only GE remained and it is GE which in the past 20 years has overtaken EMD in the locomotive sales stakes. But here, for the moment, and elsewhere in Europe the 66 remains the best selling diesel of recent years, although with the advent of GE's Powerhaul product (aka Ugly Betty) that may change.<br />
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GM sold EMD to two private equity groups in 2005, who in June 2010 sold it to Caterpillar Inc.  EMD and their predecessors have been in the rail internal combustion engine market almost from the beginning (EMC was originally founded in 1922), I for one hope they survive and prosper in the 21st Century. <br />
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Here is a selection of shed pictures, from other galleries on the site for those of you who can't get enough of Britain's Favourite Diesel :-)

Britain's Favourite Diesel

nick86235

Like them or loathe them, the EMD JT42CWR, better known as the class 6 ...

Updated: Dec 12, 2014 3:26am PST

Goblin : My first encounter with the Gospel Oak to Barking Line was in the late 1960s when with the son of a neighbour we caught the train, a DMU of course, to Barking from Kentish Town. I don't remember much else to be truthful. Over the years its fortunes have waxed and waned, I recall that in the 1980s, when I was living in Forest Gate in East London, there was very little freight traffic over the route owing to weight restrictions on some parts of the line. Today it is enjoying a renaissance thanks to the injection of upgrade funds from Transport for London and Network Rail, although it no longer hosts boat trains from St Pancras to Tilbury as it did in years gone by.<br />
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The line's history is quite complicated, what we know today as a single integrated route was in fact two railways. The oldest was the Tottenham and Hampstead Junction which opened in 1868. Originally owned by the Great Eastern (who promoted it) it later fell into the hands of the Midland and, later still, became a joint Midland &amp; GER operation. East of what is now South Tottenham is the route of the Tottenham and Forest Gate which opened in 1894 and was a Midland and London Tilbury &amp; Southend undertaking. Today the 'join' between the two lines at South Tottenham is still quite evident by the track geometry!<br />
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Being non-electrified there are a number of decent shots from overbridges and stations, the bridge shots often needing steps foir a decent view. Until 2009 the line boasted a mechanical signal box at Harringay Park and a slew of both motor worked and manual semaphores. Now it's LED colour lights, which control both a busy freight scene and also LOROL's 15 minute interval passenger service with new class 172 Turbostars.

Goblin

nick86235

My first encounter with the Gospel Oak to Barking Line was in the late ...

Updated: Dec 12, 2014 3:26am PST

Class 57/3 diesels : 105 photos recording these unsung locos at work 2003 - 2014.

Class 57/3 diesels

andrewstransport

105 photos recording these unsung locos at work 2003 - 2014.

Updated: Dec 11, 2014 9:39am PST

Rail Scene - 2013 : The rail scene during 2013.
Please remember that all photographs in this collection are the copyright of myself and therefore should not be published elsewhere without permission.

Rail Scene - 2013

Colin Grafham

The rail scene during 2013. Please remember that all photographs in th ...

Updated: Dec 11, 2014 8:07am PST

AROUND WESTON-SUPER-MARE 2014. : UPDATED 10th DECEMBER 2014.

AROUND WESTON-SUPER-MARE 2014.

Transportmedia

UPDATED 10th DECEMBER 2014.

Updated: Dec 10, 2014 4:31am PST

South Wales colliery steam, 1974 : 24 photos of industrial steam in its final years at collieries in south Wales.

South Wales colliery steam, 1974

andrewstransport

24 photos of industrial steam in its final years at collieries in sout ...

Updated: Dec 10, 2014 2:33am PST

The 67s : The class 67 (EMD type JT 42HW-HS) was ordered by EWS primarily for mail traffic, which they worked away from the electrified network until Royal Mail abandoned rail, and EWS, in 2001. Since then they have continued to find work both on freight and, more recently, as frontline passenger power with Scotrail, open access operator Wrexham, Shropshire and Marylebone, Chiltern Railways and Arriva Trains Wales. In terms of livery most still wear the EWS maroon and gold, but a number were repainted for Wrexham and Shropshire and continue in the same livery for Chiltern whilst two wear the blue of DBS subsidiary Arriva Trains Wales. 67018 Keith Heller is in DB cherry red and sports a giant maple leaf in honour of its namesake, the Canadian CEO of EWS and DBS who retired back in early 2010. 67005 and 006 are in 'Royal' livery, 67026 sports a union flag on silver flanks and 67029 is decked in silver for use with the DBS Executive Train<br><br>
I think they are quite attractive machines as modern diesels go. Railfans nicknamed them Skips on account of their shape.<br><br>
This gallery celebrates their varied career, mainly taken since losing the mail contract.

The 67s

nick86235

The class 67 (EMD type JT 42HW-HS) was ordered by EWS primarily for ma ...

Updated: Dec 06, 2014 8:00pm PST

Section 005: Coaching Stock (A6 format) : This series of books, introduced in August 1979, specifically lists Loco-hauled coaches & vans, coaches from DMUs & EMUs are listed in their own sections, although HST stock is included here. Sub-titled British Rail Pocket Book No.3, it changed to No.2 in 1989, when Multiple Units (No.2) split into two, becoming Nos.3 (DMUs) and 4 (EMUs).

Section 005: Coaching Stock (A6 format)

Dave Rowland

This series of books, introduced in August 1979, specifically lists Lo ...

Updated: Dec 03, 2014 2:47pm PST