Submarines

 Lucky you! It's a new day - go vote for your favorite photos!

Recent Galleries

WW II Submarine "Balao" Class USS-Pampanito : USS Pampanito (SS-383) is a World War II Balao class Fleet submarine museum and memorial that is open for visitors daily at San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf. Pampanito made six patrols in the Pacific during World War II during which she sank six Japanese ships and damaged four others.

USS Pampanito and her crew were successful during her 6 war patrols in the Pacific. When the war ended she returned to San Francisco. From 1945-1960 she was unused, mothballed, but maintained to be reactivated if needed. From 1961-1970 she was used as a shore side training platform, never to dive again. After that she was again unused until she became a museum and memorial in 1982. With the exception of the hatch and ladders used by visitors to enter and leave her, the submarine is virtually as she was in 1945.

To easily navigate this page, you can click each thumbnail below and see its photo on the right, or you can click "Next" to page through the thumbnails. You can click the photo on the right anytime and get an enlarged image, and you can click "Next" also if you don't want to click each thumbnail. To return to the previous page you were viewing, or any page including the Home Page, just click the string of opened pages in the upper left hand corner of any page.

WW II Submarine "Balao" Class USS-Pam...

John Coleman (eye-of-John)

USS Pampanito (SS-383) is a World War II Balao class Fleet submarine m ...

Updated: Dec 04, 2010 12:22am PST

Soviet "Foxtrot" Class Attack Sub B-39 - San Diego : One of a fleet of diesel electric submarines the Soviet Navy called “Project 641,” B-39 was commissioned in the early 1970s and served on active duty for more than 20 years. 300 feet in length and displacing more than 2000 tons, B-39 is among the largest conventionally powered submarines ever built. She was designed to track U.S. and NATO warships throughout the world’s oceans.

B-39, assigned to the Soviet Pacific fleet, undoubtedly stalked many of the U.S. Navy’s ships home ported in San Diego. Now, less than 20 years after the collapse of the Berlin Wall signaled the end of the Cold War, she is berthed on San Diego Bay amidst her former adversaries. Soviet Project 641 submarines, classified as “Foxtrot” by NATO, are essentially larger and more powerful versions of German World War II era U-boats.

Low-tech but lethal, she carried 24 torpedoes while she was on patrol-some capable of delivering low-yield nuclear warheads. B-39 carried a crew of 78 and could dive to a depth of 985 feet before threatening the integrity of her nickel steel pressure hull. The Soviet and then Russian Federation’s navies deployed these submarines from the mid 1950s through the early 1990s. They played a part in many of the Cold War’s most tense moments including the Cuban Missile Crisis. Text from San Diego San Diego Maritime Museum website.

To easily navigate this page, you can click each thumbnail below and see its photo on the right, or you can click "Next" to page through the thumbnails. You can click the photo on the right anytime and get an enlarged image, and you can click "Next" also if you don't want to click each thumbnail. To return to the previous page you were viewing, or any page including the Home Page, just click the string of opened pages in the upper left hand corner of any page.

Soviet "Foxtrot" Class Attack Sub B-3...

John Coleman (eye-of-John)

One of a fleet of diesel electric submarines the Soviet Navy called �� ...

Updated: Jul 18, 2010 11:32am PST

Submarine USS Dolphin Deep Diving Research Sub : USS Dolphin (AGSS-555) was the United States Navy's only operational diesel-electric, deep-diving, research and development submarine.[2] Her keel was laid down on 9 November 1962 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. She was launched on 8 June 1968 sponsored by Mrs. Daniel K. Inouye, and commissioned on 17 August 1968 with Lieutenant Commander J.R. McDonnell in command. Despite her recent repair and upgrade, Dolphin was  decommissioned on 15 January 2007 and was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on the same date. She is now a museum ship in San Diego Bay under the management of the San Diego Maritime Museum.  Story of the USS Dolphin from Wikipedia.

n 21 May 2002, at about 1130 PDT, while operating approximately 100 miles (160 km) off the coast of San Diego, California, Dolphin was cruising on the surface, recharging its batteries, when a torpedo shield door gasket failed, and the boat began to flood. Due to high winds and 10-to-11-foot (3.0 to 3.4 m) swells in the ocean, approximately 70 to 85 tons of seawater entered the ship, an amount perilously close to the boat's reserve buoyancy. The flooding shorted electrical panels and started fires.

After 90 minutes, Commander Stephen Kelety, Dolphin's commanding officer, ordered the crew of 41 and two civilian Navy employees to abandon ship. The Oceanographic Research ship McGaw was operating in the vicinity and immediately responded.
The fire and flooding was beyond the ability of the crew to control so they were evacuated by small boat to McGaw after the submarine hatches had been secured. All crewmembers were safely recovered with only a few minor injuries. Two crewmembers were recovered from the water by United States Coast Guard helicopter during the transfer. McGaw transported the crew to San Diego.
The quick response of the crew placed the submarine in a stable condition.

Submarine Support Vessel Kellie Chouest got underway from San Diego early on 22 May to assist in the recovery assessment. Dolphin was towed back to San Diego the following day.
To easily navigate this page, you can click each thumbnail below and see its photo on the right, or you can click "Next" to page through the thumbnails. You can click the photo on the right anytime and get an enlarged image, and you can click "Next" also if you don't want to click each thumbnail. To return to the previous page you were viewing, or any page including the Home Page, just click the string of opened pages in the upper left hand corner of any page.

Submarine USS Dolphin Deep Diving Res...

John Coleman (eye-of-John)

USS Dolphin (AGSS-555) was the United States Navy's only operational d ...

Updated: Jul 17, 2010 7:17pm PST

Soviet "Foxtrot" Class Attack Sub Scorpion - Long Beach : Scorpion is one of the Soviet-designated "Project 641" (and NATO-designated "Foxtrot") class of submarines manufactured between 1957 and 1983 at shipyards in Leningrad (today's St. Petersburg, Russia). These were among the largest and most lethal non-nuclear-powered submarines ever built. Fifty-eight Foxtrot-class vessels were originally built for the Soviet Navy, with an additional seven built for the Indian Navy, six for the Libyan Navy, and six for the Cuban Navy. Military researchers believe that Soviet Foxtrot-class subs participated in naval operations related to the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962.

Each Foxtrot-class sub could be propelled for up to 5 days by electric motors powered by a large bank of batteries found beneath the main interior deck. The sub was fitted with three diesel engines for recharging the batteries. To run the diesels (and expel their exhaust gases), the sub would travel near the ocean's surface and extend a snorkel tube into the fresh air. 

Information from; Paul K. Sholar LA Unique Travel Examiner

To easily navigate this page, you can click each thumbnail below and see its photo on the right, or you can click "Next" to page through the thumbnails. You can click the photo on the right anytime and get an enlarged image, and you can click "Next" also if you don't want to click each thumbnail. To return to the previous page you were viewing, or any page including the Home Page, just click the string of opened pages in the upper left hand corner of any page.

Soviet "Foxtrot" Class Attack Sub Sco...

John Coleman (eye-of-John)

Scorpion is one of the Soviet-designated "Project 641" (and NATO-desig ...

Updated: Jul 13, 2010 6:25pm PST

WWII Submarine "Gato" Class USS Bowfin : Welcome aboard the USS Bowfin, a Gato Class WWII Submarine moored at Pearl Harbor Hawaii. Launched December 7th 1942, exactly one year after the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, she patrolled the Pacific Ocean during her service until the end of WWII.
 
Her duties included interdiction of Japanese merchant and warship for which she sank a total of four, including one Vichy French vessel. She is also credited with the sinking of another thirty “Maru” or merchant ships. Some of her other duties included lifeguard duties, the rescuing of downed pilots and seamen whose ships were sunk as the result of enemy action, and mine detection duties, mapping of enemy minefields.

The Bowfin had many close calls during her service, including multiple depth charge attacks by enemy warships. She has the singular distinction of having actually sunk an enemy bus that was parked on a pier while it was being loaded with enemy soldiers.The Bowfin is open to the public, and for anyone interested in the history of naval warfare in the Pacific during WWII, it is a must see, along with the USS Arizona Memorial and the Battleship USS Missouri.

To easily navigate this page, you can click each thumbnail below and see its photo on the right, or you can click "Next" to page through the thumbnails. You can click the photo on the right anytime and get an enlarged image, and you can click "Next" also if you don't want to click each thumbnail. To return to the previous page you were viewing, or any page including the Home Page, just click the string of opened pages in the upper left hand corner of any page.

WWII Submarine "Gato" Class USS Bowfin

John Coleman (eye-of-John)

Welcome aboard the USS Bowfin, a Gato Class WWII Submarine moored at P ...

Updated: Dec 04, 2009 1:33am PST

Search Submarines