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Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii) [hybrid]  (December 10, 2005)    This was the first "spike" of flowers from this beauteous plant, shown in previous photo.    Euphorbia - Euphorbus was the Greek physician of King Juba II (about 50 BC to 19 AD) of Numidia (present day Algeria). King Juba II was the first person to find a succulent-type Euphorbia, and he named it after his physician.     Milii - named for Baron Milius, once governor of the island of Bourbon, who introduced the species into cultivation in France in 1821.     Splendens - This older species name means splendid.     The common names allude to the legend that the Euphorbia Milii worn by Christ at the time of his crucifixion was made from stems of this plant. Interestingly, the stems of this plant are pliable and can be intertwined into a circle. There exists substantial evidence that the species, native to Madagascar, had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ.     Plants were brought into the U.S. industry as novelties, but due to the thorny stems and lack of freeze tolerance, they stalled out in the cacti collector's market. Now, after 30 years of breeding and selection by various professional and private enthusiasts, these plants are an exotic addition to any nursery's crop portfolio.    This is a yellow hybrid; the flowers are much larger than the "regular" Crown of Thorns.
Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima)  (December 6, 2008)    The Poinsettia is a favorite flower in the United States with its beautiful, red, star-shape. It is called the "Flame Leaf" in Central America or "Flower of the Holy Night" and was brought here over a hundred years ago by Dr. Joel Poinsett, our first ambassador to Mexico. Most of the poinsettias used now come from California.
Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii) [hybrid] (December 10, 2005)

This was the first "spike" of flowers from this beauteous plant, shown in previous photo.

Euphorbia - Euphorbus was the Greek physician of King Juba II (about 50 BC to 19 AD) of Numidia (present day Algeria). King Juba II was the first person to find a succulent-type Euphorbia, and he named it after his physician.

Milii - named for Baron Milius, once governor of the island of Bourbon, who introduced the species into cultivation in France in 1821.

Splendens - This older species name means splendid.

The common names allude to the legend that the Euphorbia Milii worn by Christ at the time of his crucifixion was made from stems of this plant. Interestingly, the stems of this plant are pliable and can be intertwined into a circle. There exists substantial evidence that the species, native to Madagascar, had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ.

Plants were brought into the U.S. industry as novelties, but due to the thorny stems and lack of freeze tolerance, they stalled out in the cacti collector's market. Now, after 30 years of breeding and selection by various professional and private enthusiasts, these plants are an exotic addition to any nursery's crop portfolio.

This is a yellow hybrid; the flowers are much larger than the "regular" Crown of Thorns.

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Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii) [hybrid]  (December 10, 2005)    This was the first "spike" of flowers from this beauteous plant, shown in previous photo.    Euphorbia - Euphorbus was the Greek physician of King Juba II (about 50 BC to 19 AD) of Numidia (present day Algeria). King Juba II was the first person to find a succulent-type Euphorbia, and he named it after his physician.     Milii - named for Baron Milius, once governor of the island of Bourbon, who introduced the species into cultivation in France in 1821.     Splendens - This older species name means splendid.     The common names allude to the legend that the Euphorbia Milii worn by Christ at the time of his crucifixion was made from stems of this plant. Interestingly, the stems of this plant are pliable and can be intertwined into a circle. There exists substantial evidence that the species, native to Madagascar, had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ.     Plants were brought into the U.S. industry as novelties, but due to the thorny stems and lack of freeze tolerance, they stalled out in the cacti collector's market. Now, after 30 years of breeding and selection by various professional and private enthusiasts, these plants are an exotic addition to any nursery's crop portfolio.    This is a yellow hybrid; the flowers are much larger than the "regular" Crown of Thorns.
Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii) [hybrid] (December 10, 2005)

This was the first "spike" of flowers from this beauteous plant, shown in previous photo.

Euphorbia - Euphorbus was the Greek physician of King Juba II (about 50 BC to 19 AD) of Numidia (present day Algeria). King Juba II was the first person to find a succulent-type Euphorbia, and he named it after his physician.

Milii - named for Baron Milius, once governor of the island of Bourbon, who introduced the species into cultivation in France in 1821.

Splendens - This older species name means splendid.

The common names allude to the legend that the Euphorbia Milii worn by Christ at the time of his crucifixion was made from stems of this plant. Interestingly, the stems of this plant are pliable and can be intertwined into a circle. There exists substantial evidence that the species, native to Madagascar, had been brought to the Middle East before the time of Christ.

Plants were brought into the U.S. industry as novelties, but due to the thorny stems and lack of freeze tolerance, they stalled out in the cacti collector's market. Now, after 30 years of breeding and selection by various professional and private enthusiasts, these plants are an exotic addition to any nursery's crop portfolio.

This is a yellow hybrid; the flowers are much larger than the "regular" Crown of Thorns.

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Photo by: Denise · See photo in original gallery.

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